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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1925"

LIBRARY 
AUGUSTA COLLEGE 




MISS BERTHA CARSWELL 




-^^ Od ^. C. ScuAOu. 5^. 




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UBRARY USE ONDf 

REESE LIBRAE Y 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 







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n havjiirf ihw volvtmc of *MAIDS AMD 
?jii. A MAN *' 5how tbc loFluence oPihc 
Greek pei-iod oF Q^t \^^e htcd a defiwite 
put-pose irj roiad. Xhe Gi-eeks, In ibelr 
Sirivirad Po^ ihe aHcinmeat op symmcit-y 
op body, nolnliiy of thou5h.i, Qod beauiy of 
Soul ^t-u-lv cbat-acierize ihe ickc-ls oF ou^ 
TUbMAW. IFweKcv^ SuccessFitlly pov^ray- 
edihcl uablerwished TUBMANI spitlt 
vviih tKe adc oP Phidias o.s a Set41n^ 
V7e ate k^ichly »-cv>rcrdecl for oiii> labor. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maidsandman19251925stud 



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THE -1925 

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PUBLISHED BY THE 
STUDENTS OF 
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Dedicati^ 

TO-LAWTON-B-EVANS 

F0RTY-TW0YEARS'SUPERIN1M)ENT 
OFTHE-RICHMONI>COUNTY-PUBUC 
SCHOOLS • TEACHER , AUTHOR- 
AND FRIEND OF CHLDHOOD - 
WE-RESPECTFULLY-DEDICATE 

THIS-VOLUME-IMPPRECIATION 

OF A LlFETllVE OF SERVICE 

IW OUR SCHOOLS 



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ORDER or BOOKS 

THE SCHOOL 

c^ OL/VwSSES cw. 

ORGANIZATIONS 
ACTIVITIES 
ATHLETICS 

PANDORAS BOX 

VA.NI T^^ FAJ R 




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Faculty 



T. H. Gakrett Principal 

Miss A. Dorothy Haixs Latin 

jNIiss Ada G. Woods .. English 

Miss Axxie M. Page French 

Miss Julia A. Flisch History 

]\Iiss Gertrude J. Comey , English 

Miss Willamette Green Mathematics 

Mrs. Margaret C. Hurst History 

Miss Marcia A. Cl.a.rk Domestic Arts 

Miss Lois Eve Science 

]Miss Helen E. Frank... English 

JNliss ^liLDRED Abernathy Latin 

Miss Katherine M. Comfort Applied Art 

IVIiss Leonora Ivey Physical Training 

]\Iiss E. Loi'isE Chiles English 

Miss Ama Lee Null Spanish 

Miss Eleanor M. Boatwright History 

iNIiss Edwixe W. Odom -.Science 

Miss Naxcy E. Haddock Domestic Science 

Miss Ann Braddy ....Mathematics 

Miss Marion Hamilton ..History 

Miss Helen Anderson . French 

Miss Edith Nachman Commercial Geography 

Miss Lois Hunt Mathematics 

]\Iiss ]\Iarg.\ret C. Kinne.\r English 

Miss Helene A. Norwood ...Science 

]Mrs. W. C. Lyeth ..Mathematics and English 

Miss Helene M. Schilling Commercial Subjects 

Miss Dorothy H albert Music 

Miss Eliza E. Tillman English 

Miss Mary E. Bryant Science 

Miss Frances Tubb Commercial Subjects 

Miss Elizabeth Str.xyhorn Mathematics 

Miss Thelm.v Xaylor Mathematics 

Miss Emma W. Plunkett Assistant Physic/d Training 

Mrs. ALary jNL Owens Librarian 

Miss Ann G. Smith Assistant Domestic Science 

Miss Louise Wilson Secretary 



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Senior Class Poem 



J'or fivf years wc liavo worked and played at Tubiium, 

And we have liad to strug'gle hard at Tubman, 

But now tlie time has come for us to kave. 

For long we liave desired to see this moment. 

This happy, lio])eful, graduation moment, 

Hut now that it has fomc, our hearts must orieve. 

Well wc have loved our schoolmates and our teaciiers, 
(Sometimes we've been unjust to these, our teachers). 
And now must come the parting of the Avays ; 
But always will tiie memories of Tubman, 
The dear old happy scenes of our own Tubman, 
Remain with us through all the future days. 

We iiave not always used our privileges. 
Now we regret those wasted ])rivileges. 
And wisli tiiey might be given us again. 
Sometimes we have not acted very wisely. 
Nor taken good advice from others wisely. 
Have even been rebellious now and then. 

But we have gained in other things than knowledge. 
Have gained in many better things than knowledge, 
We've learned ideals of truth, our School, from you. 
And in the life that opens now before us, 
The vague alluring way that lies before us. 
We i)romise to remain forever true. 

And now, oh Class of Twenty-Six who follow, 
If we have set a good example, follow. 
But ])rofit by mistakes that we have made. 
Oh, hold forever high the Tubman standard. 
Nor let there be one blot upon that standard ; 
The glorv which we boast must never fade. 

Velma Bell, '25. 



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Senior Class 

■{• •:- 

Class Colors — Purple and Gold Class Flower — Pansy 

Motto — '"Through the dust to the stars." 

+ + 

OFFICERS 

Kathekixe Wiggins. ..President 

Marg.aket Johnson Viee-President 

Ida Wall. ..Secretary and Treasurer 




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KeBECVA El.IZARKTH ANDREWS 



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DimoTHY Fl.K.MIXli Bee.1. 



Mary Loi" Baxlf.y 



Frances Velma Bei.l 




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Emii.y Brooks 



Catherine Alston Branch 




Orrie Mozelle Cain- 



Alice Mae Cartledge 




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Philomfxa Fuller 




Ida GrossiMax 



RlTH MiDDLETOX GrEEXE 



MAitiE Christixe Greexe 




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Mahtha Rlprecht Lestek 



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Gladys Elizabeth Milleh 




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ISABELI.F M'aIKKK XoRTH 

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JosvK Elizabeth rAXKNix 



Lai'ree Ponds 



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Mary Etta Sikes 




Dorothy Jacquei.txe Smith 



Arvoxia Sizemore 




Marie Sims 



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Minnie Reeves VAifiHx 




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RrBEN'A IxEZ Whai.ey 



Addie Sue Wei.tch 




May White 



Marguerite Connor Wescoat 



Katherine Wiggins 




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Junior Class 



Class Colors— Pink and Uliife Class Flower — Pink Rose Bud 

'SUAfo^^'Onc for a//, (ind all for one/' 

OFFICERS 

Ola Ht^tchesox... ..- President 

Helen Dicks Vice-President 

Sara Sheppard Secretary and Treasurer 

4- + 



Andrews. Lucy 
Armstrongr. Mary 
Arnold, Emma 
Bannester, Ruby 
Batten. Marion 
Bland, Frances 
Brawner. Georgia 
Brooks, Emily 
Brown, Agnes 
Burcli. Evelyn 
Burnette, Ruth 
Cannon, Myrtis 
Carlyon, Elizabeth 
Carswell, Vera 
Chew, Mary 
Clarke, Frances 
Copeland. Ina Sue 
Corbitt, Melvis 
Culpepper, Margaret 
Culpepper. Meryl 
Currie. Margaret 
Curry, Catherine 
Davidson. Jean 
Davis. Lucile 
D'Antignac, Martha 
Dicks. Doi-othy 
Dicks. Helen 
Downing, Clemmie 
Dykes. Lollie Mae 
Dye, Ruth 
Ellison, Mary 
Fair. I aura 
Fennell. Helen 
Fleming. Virginia 
Fike. Mary Belle 
Fiske, Mary 
Fletcher, Mary 
Friedman. Mollie 
Fulcher. Eloise 
Fuller, Frances 
Garrett, Mildred 
Gilchrist, Erline 
Green. Myrtle 
Gunn, Margaret 
Hagood, Ida Mae 



Hair. Ruby 
Halhnan. Winifred 
Hamilton. Elsie 
HardTnan. Catherine 
Harvin. Mary Will 
Hawkins. Ethel 
Heath, Violette 
Hersey, Mary 
Hill, Caroline 
Hilton, Myra 
Holley, Arvis 
Howard. Langhorne 
Hutcheson, Ola 
James. Meryl 
.lohnson. FMoride 
Joplin. Catherine 
Jones. Elizabeth 
Jordan, Katherine 
Kelly, Lillian 
Kelly. Lois 
Kennicott. Llewellyn 
Kidilke, Blanche 
Lamar. Mary 
Lawrence. Ruby 
Luckey, Juanita 
Martin. Annie Mae 
Mayes, Myrtle 
Miles, Mary 
Miller. Leone 
Mills. Willie Mae 
Morris. Mrginia 
Murrah. Martha 
McDaniel. Andrina 
McDaniel, Evelyn 
McElmnrray. Margaret 
McEwen. Helen 
Neary. Mera 
Newton, Theo 
Norris, Susie 
O'Connor. Lessie 
Oliver, Louise 
Otis, Elizabeth 
Owens. Jessie 
Perkins, Helen 
Plunkett, Sue 
Fonds. Dorothy 
Towell, .Mice 



Powell, Blanche 
Power. May Belle 
Randall, Inez 
Rcab, Laura 
Kliodes, Sunie 
Rogers, Voncile 
Rowland. Wilmina 
Sammons. Lucia 
Satoher, Emmalyne 
Sawilowsky. Estelle 
ScliMciilcr. Heline 
Scdtt. Bessie 
Sedwick.MattieMae 
Seldcn, Eugenia 
Sellears. Eula 
Senn. Ressie 
Sliellhovise. Lucille 
bheppard, Sara 
Shimoff, Pearl 
Shivers, Asenath 
Simons, Hazel 
Simowitz, Louise 
Simpson, Delia 
Smith, Ellen 
■Smith, Quilla 
Spann, Alice 
Steed, Dene 
Steed, Helen 
Steed. Lois 
Steinberg, Theresa 
Steinberg. Sarah 
Tanenbaum, Minnie 
Thompson. Alberta 
Tonunins, Minnie 
Trigg, Ellen Lyon 
Trowbridge. Lucile 
Vignatti. Rosa 
Wallace, Betty 
Warner, Elizabeth 
Weigand, Lucille 
Weigle, Kate 
Wilensk>", Jennie 
Willianis, Sarah 
Winter, Caroline 
Wolfe, Frances 



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AXDREWS 


Armstrong 


Cannon 


Arnold 


Bannester 


Bland 


Brawn ER 
Chew 


Brown 


Birch 


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Carl YON 


Cars WELL 


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Cl'L PEPPER 


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Dykes 

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Mayes 


Miles 


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McEwEN 


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Oliver 


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Be A Sport 

If it's liard to pliiv the gaiiio. 

Be a s|)()rt. 
If VDii have to take tlie bhuiie. 

Be el .sport. 
\Vhen tlie otlier feHows win 
Take vour liekiii<r witii a grin. 

Be a sport. 

\Vheii you're told "It can't be done," 

Be a sport. 
Try it— tliat is half the fun — 

Be a s])()rt. 
If vou'i'e sure tlie thing is right 
Do it, and you'll win the fight. 

Be a s])ort. 

Though you're feeling tired and blue, 

Be a sport. 
\Veary and discouraged too, 

Be a s])ort. 
And, when years of youth have pa.ssed. 
To this slogan still hold fast — 

"Be a s].ort." 



M.\RY FiSKE, "2(i. 







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Sophomore Class 



Class Colors — Red and White Class Flower — Red Rose 

Motto — "To he. not to seem; to do. not to dream.''' 

OFFICERS 

Lois Van Pelt President 

Louise Garrett Vice-President 

Sarah Whitney Secretary and Treasurer 



Adams, Rutli 
Akerman, Elizabetli 
Allen. Elsie 
Anderson. Annie 
Atkinson. Elizabeth 
Austin, Ida 
Bailey, Ossie 
Bailie, Marg:aret 
Bargreron. Edith 
Barrett, Ann 
Bassford. Lee 
Beard. Alice 
Bell, Julia 
Bell. Sara 
Benson, Mildred 
Bishop. Vivian 
Bisrnon. Hilda 
Bothwell, Marv 
Bowden. Edith 
Brazelle. Mildred 
Brickie. Wylena 
Broome. Verdine 
Cadle, Gennie 
Capers, Clara 
Capers. Earnestine 
Chancer, Thehna 
Chandler, Elizabeth 
Connor, Edith 
Copeland, Sarah 
Davidson. Li la 
Davis. Benola 
Deas. Dorothy 
Dolvin. Anne 
Dolvin, Clifford 
Dolvin. Lily 
Lorn. Hazel 
Dyches, Elinor 
Edwards, Florrie 
Elliot. Irene 
Ellis. Marianne 
Evans. Dell 
Karris, Nettie 
Fender, Beulah 
Fennell. Maurice 
Fields, Mary 



4, ^ 



Fickling, Louise 
Fluker, Jane 
Ford, AUie 
Garner. Everlie 
Garrett. Louise 
Gay. Amy Lou 
Getzen. Frances 
Goldstein. Rachel 
Grablowsky. Miriam 
Grear. Evelyn 
Greiner. Doris 
Gunn, Ethel 
Gunter, Pearl 
Hair. Elma 
Hall. Uldine 
Hammond. Katherine 
Hancock, Iris 
Hankinson. Stella 
Hattaway, Leonora 
Helmlv. Louise 
Higrgs. Odessa 
Hildebrandt, Marguerite 
Hill, Susie 
Hixson, Vera 
Holden. Lydia 
Hughes, Emma 
Humphrey, Charlie B. 
Hurt. Maude 
Hutto. Eugenia 
Irvine, Mary 
Johnson, Elizabeth 
Jones, Clemmie 
Jones. Evelyn 
Jordan. Ruth 
Kesler. Heloise 
Knight. Ruth 
Langley. Doris 
Lefkowitz. Jennie 
Littleton, Helen 
Lombard. Ruby 
Lynch, Ida 
MacMurphy. Adele 
Maddox, Tlielma 
Markert, Florence 
Maxwell, Jeannette 
Moring, Frankie 
Mobley, Jean 
Murphy, Mary 
McCarty, Leila Belle 



McCormick, Elton 
McClellan, Grace 
O'Hara. Elizabeth 
Owens, Marv 
Park, Elizabeth 
Pedersen, Dorothy 
Peters, Mary 
Philhps, Hilda 
Pilcher, Elizabetli 
Pritchard, Margaret 
Redd. Lillian 
Ruben. Rosa 
Schaufele, lona 
Schneider, Sophie Lee 
Seals, Grace 
Simmons, Doris 
Smith, Ruth 
Speth. Dorothy 
Spires, Elsie 
Steinek, Elsie 
Stringer. Marguerite 
Stuart, Virginia 
Sturman, Elizabeth 
Tanenbaum, Minnie 
Thomas, Norma 
Thompson. Louise 
Turner, Margaret 
Van Pelt. Lois 
Verderv, Catherine 
Walters. Helen 
AValters. Louise 
Walton, Gussie 
Ward. Ruth 
Watkins. Caroline 
Weathersiiee, Iva 
Wells, ^h^rie 
Whaley, Lula 
Whitaker, Mildred 
Whitney, Sarah 
Wiggins, Ruby 
Wilhams. Sudie Boyd 
Williamson, Virginia 
Wolfe, Helen 
Wood. Margaret 
Yearty, Annie 



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Freshman Class 



Class Colors — Blue and White Class Flower — Pansy 

Motto — ''To the stars through bolts and bars." 

•{• * 

OFFICERS 

Louise Brady. President 

Wallace North Vice-President 

Elizabeth Printup Secretary and Treasurer 



+ + 



Adams. Juanita 
Allen. Matilda 
Anderson. Reby 
Andronosky. Ida B. 
Anthony, Jeannette 
Anthony. Sara 
Armstrong:. Juanita 
Babbitt, Mary 
Baird. Alyne 
Baird. Sara 
Barchan. Irene 
Barton, Frances 
Barton, Ludie 
Peasley, Mary 
Blanchard, Mary Emma 
Bonnett, Jessie 
Bothwell, Marguerite 
Bowers, Mary Etta 
Boxx, Evelyn 
Boyd. Elizabeth 
Brady. Louise 
Brisendine. Elizabeth 
Bristow, Annie Mae 
Britt, Ethel 
Broadwater. Katy 
Brown. Juanita 
Busbia, Marion 
Bvrd, Elizabeth 
Caldwell. Mary 
Canada. Thelma 
Cartledg:e, Mildred 
Casey. Muriel 
Cates. Mable 
Clark, Nancy 
Clemmons. Ruth 
Cooper, Gertrude 
Copelan, Evelyn 
Crenshaw, Lucille 
Crickenberg:er. Corinne 
Cromer, Cieo 
Culley. Marion 
Daly, Rosa 
Danforth, Thomasine 
Decker, Dorothy 



Derrick. Harriet 
Dickson, Frankie 
Dixon. Thelma 
Doolittle. Katie M. 
Dorn. Martha 
Dunn. Louise 
Durden, Mary Willie 
Edwards, Flossie 
Edwards, Julia 
Edwards, Martha 
Edwins. Myrtis 
Elliott. Marg:aret 
Fair. Catherine 
Ferguson, Elizabeth 
Fickling. Mary 
Flowers, Mary 
Foster. Helen 
Foster. Julia 
Gardiner, Mary C. 
Gardner, Helen 
Glisson, Estelle 
Goldfarb. Margaret 
Goodell, Mabel 
Goss. Margaret 
Griffin. Alice 
Grusin, Mollie 
Gunn, Cecil 
Hagler. Evelyn 
Halhnan. Ruth 
Harris, Mary 
Hardaway, Louise 
Harrison, Marion 
Heath, Thelma 
Henderson. Parmie 
Hoffman, Beatrice 
Hogan, Vivian 
Hook, Lillian 
House, Norma 
Howard, Ruth 
Hulbert. Marie 
James. Elma 
Jarrell, Gertrude 
Jarrett. Carolyn 
Jennings, Billie 
Jenkins, Culia 
Jones, Ann 



Jones, Catherine 
Jones, Edna 
Jones, Frances 
Joplin. Mary 
Kelly, Mary 
Kent. Lillian 
Kiti-liens. Elinor 
Knight, Edna 
Laml)ack, Dollie 
Lamkin, Nora 
Layton, Marion 
Levy, Rose 
Lonergan, Alma 
Macky, Elizabeth 
Maddox, Gladys 
Matheny, Katherine 
Minnis, Margaret 
Mobley. Elizabeth 
Moore, Louise 
Moring, Margaret 
Morris, Adrienne 
McClaln, Lucile 
McClain, Phrontis 
McCormack. Catlierine 
McCollock, Evelyn 
McEwen, Cawthon 
McKenzie. Leone 
McNutt, Helen 
Neal. Georgia 
Nixon, Catherine 
North, Wallace 
Oliver, Lottie 
Owens. Carolyn 
Owens, Margaret 
Owens, Margaret 
I'altrowitz, Annie 
Patche. Dorothy 
Peebles, Margaret 
Printup, Elizabeth 
Ramsey, Florence 
Rennison, Alma 
Rennison, Nellie 
Ulieney, Louise 
Rliodes. Anna Kate 
Ridgely. Elizabeth 
Robinson. Laura 



Robinson, Mabel 
Rock, Esther 
Rogers. Edna 
Sanders, Eloise 
Sawilowsky, Birdie 
Scarboro, Elsie 
Seago, Edna 
Shivers, Mary 
Skinner, Margaret 
Smitli, Ellen 
Smith, Hazel 
Spaulding, Mary 
Stanford, Roesel 
Steel. Ruby 
Stockton. Merle 
Stoniker, Carrie 
Stoniker, Hattie 
Story. Ruth 
Street, Ellen 
Sullivan, Katharine 
Sumerau, Alice 
Sumerau, Nell 
Thomas, Mabel 
Tommins, Louise 
Trader, Ruth 
Tunkle, Maydelle 
Turner, Robbie 
Van Pelt, Elizabeth 
Wall, Thelma 
Walker, Ruby 
Walton, Delle 
Walton. Susan 
Ward. Annie Kate 
Weathers, Annie Kate 
Williams, Allene 
WMlliams, Alma 
Wilson. Margaret 
Wilson, Maudie 
W^olfe, Adis 
Womack, Ruth 
W^ren, Agnes 
Yates, Frieda 
Young, Margaret 



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Akerman. Laura 
Babbit. Elva 
Bailev. Rachel 
Bailev, Sue Walker 
Baik, Mary 
Baxley. Martha 
Beall, Mary Irvine 
Beli. Marie 
Bigrnon. Regina 
Boyd, Pearl 
Branch. Mary 
Brantley. Evelyn 
Brisendine. Ruth 
Brooks, Idell 
Brooks, Ruth 
Brown, Lillian 
Brown, Marion 
Brucker. Mabel 
Buck. Willie J. 
Buckley. Leonora 
B\Td, Inez 
Cain, Claddie 
Caldwell. Margaret 
Campbell. Frances 
Cardon, Norma 
Carl. Mable 
Carpenter. Grace 
Cartledge. Maybelle 
Chavous, Audrey 
Chavous, Gladys 
Chavous, Katie 
Churchill. Natalie 
Clark, Katie 
Clarke. Mary 
Clark, Virginia 
Cobb. Shirley 
Connell. Frances 
Crawford, Blanche 
Crumpton. Mildred 
Cumbaa, Gaynelle 
Davidson, Alma 
Davidson, Linda 
Davis. Louise 
De Medicis, Jessie 
Dike, Bessie 
Duhig, Evelyn 
Durden, Virginia 
Dye, Mary 
Earnhardt, Frances 
Edmunds, Lillian 
Edwards. Juanita 
Farmer. Hazel 
Farrill, Dorothy 
Farris, Ruth 



Sub Freshman Class 



+ + 



Faulkner, Angelle 
Fickling, Mattie Mae 
Fiske. Harriet 
tJage, Doris 
Garrett, Harriet 
Gay, Agnes 
Gilchrist, Florence 
Gilson, Margaret 
Glover, Juanita 
Goldberg, Lees 
Goldstein, Gussie 
(iordon. Elizabeth 
Goss, Mattie 
Gracey. Sarah 
Grealish, Margaret 
Greneker, Pickens 
Hair, Agnes 
Hallman, Margaret 
Hamilton, Vera 
Hancock, Ossie 
Hardy, Margaret 
Harmon. Mary Anna 
Heath, Dottie 
Heath, Ruth 
Helmlv, Viola 
Hill. Mabel 
Hilson, Audry 
Hoffman. Ethel 
Holley, Mildred 
Holley, Naomi 
Holman, Emily 
Holmes, Erline 
Home, Margaret 
Howard, Julia 
Howard, \''iola 
Hughes, Barbara 
Hull, Katherine 
Hiindlej", Margaret 
Jackson. Elenka 
Jackson. W^aurega 
James, Ollie 
James, Nina 
Jenkins, Inez 
Jones, Bertha 
Jones, Betty 
Jones, Dorothy 
Jones. Frances 
Jones. Mattie 
Johnson, Blanche 
Johnson. Corrie 
Kellv, Billv 
Kelly. Theo 
Kesler, Hulda 
Kimbrell, Ida Lee 
Krenson, Julia 
Kuehnel, Pauline 
Laird. Marie 
Landrum, Alice 



Lansdell, Dorothy 
Lazenby, Nita 
Lee. Virginia 
Levy, Lois 
Lewis. Lillie Mav 
Lockhart, Elizabeth 
Lombard, Marvilla 
Ludwig. Louise 
Lundv, Vivian 
Maddox, Mildred 
Manatis, Lula 
Marsh, Mary 
Mathews, Louise 
Melton, Eula 
Miller, Leslie 
Mitcliell. Alberta 
Montgomery, Anna 
Montgomery. Daisy 
Mulcay, Elizabeth 
Mullen, Margaret 
Murphey, Louise 
Murphy, Martha 
McAlhanny, Catherine 
McCormack. Lillie M. 
McCormick. Mildred 
McNaughton, Zoe 
Norman, Frances 
North, Neville 
Ogilvie, Isabel 
O'Neal. Dorothy 
Page, Marion 
Palmer, Thelma 
Palmer, Velma 
Parks, Mary 
Partain, Derrell 
Parish. Catherine 
Partridge, Beauford 
Pate, Evelyn 
Pearson, Zella Mae 
Peebles, Cary 
Piei'ce, Frances 
Plunkett, Edna 
Pollard, Emmie Lee 
Pollard, Mary 
Pomerance, Naomi 
Pond, Edith 
Pound, Frances 
Powell, Ellen 
Prescott, Esther 
Prather, Virginia 
Ray. Ethel 
Reab. Ann 
Redd. Dorothy 
Reeves, Syble 
Reville. Eunice 
Rhodes. Marian 
Rhodes, Winona 
Rheinwalt, Kathleen 



Rickerson, Florence 
Rickerson, Annie 
Roberts, Mary 
Robertson. Nellie 
Roche, Helen 
Roesel. Eveh'n 
Roesel, Rutli 
Rogers, (iene 
Rosontlial. 1 eah 
Rountree. Elizabeth 
Ruflfin, Ethel 
Russell, Doretta 
Sanders, Julia 
Scarborough, Thelma 
Scattergood. Ora 
Senn, Grace 
Sherlock, Sara 
Shipp. Noel 
Smith, Frankie 
Smith. Helen 
Smith, Twedis 
Southall. Mary 
Spradley, Effie 
Sprouse, Louise 
Stone, Mary 
Strickland. Hazel 
Tarver. Elizabeth 
Taylor, Helen 
Teasley, Elizabeth 
Thomas. Myra 
Thomas, Nancy 
Thompson, Myrtle 
Tillman, Annie Sue 
Toole, Grace 
Toole, Kathleen 
Town. Evelyn 
Vaughn, Evelyn 
Wagnon. Anna 
Walker, Irene 
Wallace. Ann 
Watson, Lillian 
Weathers. Mary 
Weeks, Ruth 
Weinstein, Esther 
West, Emily 
White, Audrey 
Williams, Elizabeth 
Williams. Genevive 
Witterner, Lena 
Winburn, Nancy 
Wolfe, Anna Elese 
Wolfe, Margaret 
Yearty, Sarah 
Young, Inez 
Young, Mildred 









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Mabel Downing 
Helen Dicks 
Alice Simmers 



Vei.ma Bell 
Marglerite Wescoat 

SlSIK QfINN 



KSTELLE SaWILOWSKV 

WiLMiNA Rowland 
Mary Fiske 



IsABELi.E North 
Vera Carswell 
Minnie To.mmins 



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Annual Staff 

SENIOR EDITORS 

Marguerite Wescoat Editor-in-Chief 

IsABELLE North Business Manager 

Velma Bell Literary Editor 

Mabel Downing. Art Editor 

Susie Quinn ....Picture Editor 

Alice Summers ....Athletic Editor 

JUNIOR ASSISTANT EDITORS 

WiLMiNA Rowland Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

Minnie Tommins . Assistant Business Manager 

Mary Fiske Assistant Literary Editor 

Vera Carswell Assistant Art Editor 

Helen Dicks Assistant Picture Editor 

Estelle Sawilowsky Assistant Athletic Editor 



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IsABELLE North 
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I Iarrikt (;,\itKi-:ri' 
Miss I'linkett 



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Athletic Council 

Alice Summers President 

IsABELLE North Vice-President 

A'iKGixiA Fleming... Treasurer 

JrLiA Bell Secretary 

Addie Sue Weltch Senior Representative 

Estelle S.wvilowsky Junior Representative 

Marguerite Hildebranut ....Sophomore Representative 

Elizabeth Brisendixe Freshman Representative 

Miss Leonora Ivey Physical Director 

Miss Emma Plunkett Assistant Physical Director 

Miss Eliz.^beth Strayhorn Faculty Representative 

jMr. T. H. Garrett Ex. Officio Member 






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Glee Club 



Martha Lester 

Velma Bell — 

Katherine Wiggins, Naxcy Clark 
Librarians 



....President 

.Secretary 



Andrews, A. 
Andrews. L. 
Andrews, R. 
Bailev. O. 
Bell. V. 
Brown. A, 
Brown, E. 
Bush. M. 
Clark. N, 
Cooper. G. 
Culpepper, M, 
Culpepper, M. 
Edwards, F. 
Ellis, M. 
Foster, H. 
Fulcher, E. 
Garrett, L, 
Gunn, M. 
Hankinson. S. 
Heath, T. 
Hixson. V. 
Holley, A. 



James, M. 
Johnson, M. 
Jones. C, 
Jones, E. 
Jones, E. 
Kelly, 1,. 
King, M. 
Lefkowitz. J. 
Lester, M. 
Liickey, J. 
Lynch. I. 
McDaniel. E. 
McNutt, H. 
Miles, M, 
Miller, E. 
Miller, G. 
Mitchell, A. 
Montgomery, A 
Murrah, M. 
Otis, E. 
Peebles, M. 
Plunkett. S. 
Printup, R. 
Rowland. W. 
Sawilowsky, E. 




Sellears. E. 
Sizemore, A. 
Smith, H. 
Speth, D. 
Stanford. R. 
Steinberg;. T. 
Thomas. M. 
Tliompson, A. 
1 rigg, E. 
Tunkle, S. 
Wall, L 
Walters, H. 
Walters, L. 
Warner, E. 
Weigle. K, 
Wells, M. 
Whitney, S. 
Wiggins, K. 
Wolfe, H. 
Wood, M, 
Young. M. 
Zealy, M. 



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Mks. Lyeth 



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Miss I'AtiE 

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The Honor League Council 

Ida Wall ; President 

WiLMixA Rowland Secretary 

Mildred Owexs Senior Representative 

Helen Dicks Junior Representative 

AxxiE AxDERsox Sopliomorc Representative 

Edxa Kxight Freshman Representative 

Georgia Xeal . Sub-Freshman Representative 

Miss Axxie M. Page Mrs. W. C. Lyeth 

Faculty Representatives 



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The Seven Ages of A Tubman Girl 

(WifJi apologies to Shakespeare) 

All tlio scliool'.s a staf^u 
And all the "iris are nierclv players; 
They have their exemptions and their failures ; 
Kach one in her time plays many parts, 
Her acts being seven ages. At first the infant, 
\Vitli her admiring family and friends. 
Then the ha])py school girl with her lunch box 
And her smiling face, tiittiiig like a bird 
Joyfully to school. And then the little "Sub" 
Who exchanged her dolls for her well loved, 
Senior Crush. And then the Freshman, 
Who important feels since I^atin's on her 
Mind. Then the So])liomore with her 
Lipstick, rouge and powder, vain of her beauty 
And careless of her marks. Then the Junior 
AVith s|)arkling eyes and hair, a shingle cut. 
Full of wise saws and up-to-date remarks. 
And so she plays her part. Last of all 
The Senior with her dignity of years, 
^Vearing spectacles of ])urple and gold 
Looking askance at youth. Last scene of all 
That ends this strange, eventful history — 
In graduation gown, with flowers galore 
Sans books, sans themes, sans cares, sans everything. 



Helen Fexxei,i,, '26 



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Senior Class Day 

+ + 

Historii of the Class of 192'> 

fiI^ E years ago a 1)uihIi of tiny wistful girls straggled through tl 
doors of Tubman. Indeed the girls were small but the class w£ 
large, the largest that had ever entered Tubman. \o one (excej 
those that were once Subs) will ever know how trying were those first days. 
The word Freshman aroused our anger for all our teasing and initiation came 
from this source and the indignities heajjed upon us by tiie Sojjhomores, too, 
tried our spirits. 

Our education began innnediately. On the first day we learned that the 
the auditorium had 864 seats, "that every class room was amply jjrovided with 
movable adjustable Moulthrop ilesks" and that the laboratories were fitted out 
with the most modern equipment. We also learned tiie significance and mean- 
ing of the term "yellow card". After our initiations were over we set about 
to organize our class. The first president of this class was Eleanor Brown. 
Under her leadership we managed to make a place for ourselves in the affairs 
of the school. Our first public appearance was in the "Pageant of the 
Pilgrims" which celebrated the three-hundredth anniversary of the landing of 
the Pilgrims. Other events which took })lace in our Sub Freshman year were 
the Lyceum Course and a May festival. We were formally introduced into 
society in April when the Seniors entertained with an Easter egg hunt in our 
honor. 

In the fall of 1921 we again assembletl, this time with Edna Reynolds as 
president. '^I'he oiilv important feature of our Freshman vear was "Prunella", 
the first and last of a series of instructive pictures to be given at the school. 
Although this year passed uneventfully it brought with it no disasters. We 
all bore the title "Freshman" with cheerful submission as we knew this stage 
must be passed through before we could become Seniors. 

Almost before we knew it another year had rolled 'round and we were 
Sophomores. This time Katherine Wiggins assumed the responsibilities of 
the presidency. After two years of athletic training wc were pronounced ready 
to go before the i)ublic. Accordingly, we were chosen to entertain the Rotary 
Club at their annual visit to the school. It was on this memorable occasion 
that we had the rare treat of hearing Mr. (iarrett, one of a talenttd (|uartet 



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.sing "Will Spearmint Lose Its Flavor on tlie Bedjiost Over Night." This year 
a May festival was again attempted (but not without first consulting Mr. 
Garrett about the weather.) This time it was in every way a success. 

Our Junior year was our "blossom time". It was at this time that we 
showed our dramatic abilities in our presentation of "The Magic Wheel". 
When field day came the ])urple and gold swept down the field victorious ! In 
addition to the class cup, the individual cup was also won by a Junior. Other 
enjoyable events of the year were a tea given by the College Club and the Junior- 
Senior banquet which was given for the class of '24 to try to show them how 
highly we valued their friendship. 

When the fall of 192-1< arrived we again assembled, this time the dignified 
Seniors of Tubman. For the third time Katherine Wiggins was elected presi- 
dent. Under her successful leadership we were able to uphold the good name 
of the Senior class. Although everyone knows that life is not made up entirely 
of sunshine we were unprepared for the dark shadow that was cast over our 
class by the announcement tiiat ]Mr. Hickman would no longer be connected with 
Tubman in an official capacity. However we were somewhat cheered by the 
assurance that he would continue his friendship and visits to his "fellow 
Tubmans." 

Now we must deal gently with the question of athletics, or it might even 
be better not to mention the subject at all. Yet we are not ashamed although 
we didn't win every game, for we made a noble attempt and all agree that it 
is better to have tried and failed than never to have tried at all. Although 
Senior privileges are not as numerous as we had expected and Senior life not all 
a bed of roses still our last year did not pass without its joys and successes. 

We all like to think of the pleasures that have filled our five years at 
Tubman. Never-the-less the best part of our history is the unwritten personal 
part, the memories which we will carry away with us and the friendships which 
we have made. Tjiese things do not need to be written down for we will never 
forget them. 

Lucy Goodkich Henry, '25. 



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Last Will and Testament 

+ + 

"^Tg-^ E, the Senior Class of Tubman High Sciiool, City of Augusta, County 
^ ■ ^ of Ricluiiond, State of Georgia ; being of unsound and indisposed 
\. ^ X mind, nearing the end of our five years sojourn here and feeling that 
'tis "better to give than receive" do hereby make, publish and declare this to be 
our "Last Will and Testament." 

ITKM I. To those who will in due course of events take our jjlaces in 
the front rows of the auditorium — we do beijueath our maidenly modesty and 
Senior dignity hoping tiiat they will profit by our example and not discuss 
last night's dates and Ramon Novarro under cover of Miss Halbert's singing. 

ITEM II. To Mr. Garrett — the leader, counselor and friend of every 
Tubman girl, we the Seniors of 1925 wish to extend our lieartfelt appreciation 
of his efforts both individual and collective in our behalf. 

ITEM III. To Sue Plunkett and Wilmina Rowland— Elizabeth Story 
and Margaret Johnson becjueath their ability to dress for "gym" in two minutes. 

ITEM IV. To Mary Fiske — Ida Bothwell leaves her never emptying 
box of "Ludens Cough Drops." 

ITEIVI V. Catherine Branch who has sj)ent the past four years in a 
hopeless attempt to dispose of some of her superfluous avoidupois leaves her 
Walter Camp Reducing Records to Mary Chew, hojiing that she will meet with 
more success. 

ITEM VI. Rosina Pearl, Belle Sawilowsky and other Ambitious A's 
leave their scholaristic ability to Virginia Fleming and other "Brilliant B's." 

ITEM VII. Dorothy Bell and Alice Summers leave their j)ackage of 
"Golden Glint" to Helen McEwen. 

ITEM VIII. Marguerite Wcscoat leaves lier ability to say the right 
thing at the right time to Mildred Garrett. 

ITEM IX. Isabelle North leaves to any one who will take it her 
serge skirt, which after five years of hard wear (two times a week to "gym" 
class) is still in a remarkable condition of repair. 



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ITEM X. To the Seniors of 1926 we leave the glass plates etched in 
Chem. class b_v the Seniors of 1925. 

ITEM XI. To the Sub Freshman Class we leave our deepest sympathy 
for the long stony path they must tread to be Seniors. 

ITEM XII. To Miss Ada G. Woods we leave a year's subscription to 
"College Humor" provided that she will use it as subject matter for her class 
I'oading. 

ITEM XIII. To Miss Julia A. Flisch — we leave the latest thing in 
dorines, "The Mayflower Conipacfcontaining rogue, lipstick and powder. 

ITEM XIV. To Miss Comey— we leave a book, "The English Lang- 
wich as She Am Spoke" by Eleanor Brown. 

ITEM XV. To Miss A. Dorothy Hains, Senior B. donates an electric 
hand and face rubber, to save her the physical exertion that she displays 
before beginning Latin lessons. 

ITEM XVI. The Senior Class bequeaths to Miss Annie Page a bolt of 
white elastic for use in emergency. 

ITEM XVII. To Clemmie Jones — May White leaves her tall stature 
in order to relieve the legatee of her arduous stretching exercises. 

ITEM XVIII. Sarah Norris leaves to Ola Hutcheson her class spirit, 
hoping that Ola will engage in all class activities. 

ITEM XIX. To the biology class of 1926, the class of 1925 leaves 
Elizabeth Story as assistant butcher. 

Drawn up in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and twentv-five. 

Testators 

Makgaret Johxsox 
Gladys Miller 



Witness 



Diana A' (hei- mark) 



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Good Morning! 



®1|^ AuguBtu QUfrnntrb 

"The Soutli's Omest Newspaper — Established 1785" 



Tlie Weatlier 

AuffiistM and 

Vicinity 

Fairand warmei 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1940 



LARGEST BALLOON 
TO FLY OVER 
AUGUSTA 

To Be Piloted by a Woman 

The largest balloon in the world 
will Hy over Augusta Wednesday. 
This balloon is piloted by Miss 
Minnie Sacre, the first woman pilot 
of a balloon. Miss Sacre is mak- 
ing a trip to the South Pole and her 
balloon will l)e the first to reach it. 
Thousands will crowd the streets to 
see it pass. 



MISS ROSINA 
PEARL WINS SPEED 
CONTEST 

Miss Rosina Pearl, a candidate 
from Augusta, defeated all other 
contestants in the national Speed 
Conversation Contest, winning the 
prize, two thousand dollars. Miss 
Pearl .spoke at the rate of one hun- 
dred and seventy-five words a min- 
ute. 



SCIENTIFIC 

SEARCH AFOOT 



Professor Murphey Under- 
takes Colossal Task 



Kalamazoo, Mich. — May 20. — 
Professor Virginia A. Murphey 
after mucli thought and study has 
at last undertaken the task of find- 
ing the lost tribe of beardless cats. 
Of course tlie scientific world awaits 
the outcome of this search with 
greatest hope, but what will we. 
the common people, do without, 
"tiie cat's whiskers"? 



STATE LEGISLATURE 
ASKED FOR AID IN 
ENLARGING TUBMAN 
HIGH SCHOOL 



Augusta Woman Leads 
Enterprise 



WOMEN STEADILY 
COMING TO THE 
FORE POLITICALLY 



New Attorney-General Well 
Received 



Atlanta, May 20. — Miss Eliza- 
beth McLendon. representative 
from Georgia asked for aid in the 
enlarging of Tubman High School 
at Augusta, Ga. Miss McLendon 
has been a representative from Ga. 
for a number of years. Her last 
request was not granted, but she 
is confident that she will eventually 
be given aid for her alma mater. 



AUTOMOBILE 
ACCIDENT NEAR 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 

CoLiMBTA, May 20. — Mrs. T. W. 

S was seriously injured while 

driving down Main Street yester- 
day when her car collided witli that 

of Mr. S. B. T The latter 

car was going at the rate of ten 
miles an hour. The speedometer 

of Mrs. S 's car showed that 

she was driving at the rate of sixty 

miles an hour. Mrs. S was 

rushed to a hospital where her con- 
dition is improving. Her car, a 
Rolls-Royce, was denioHshed. 

An interesting coincidence is the 

fact that when Mrs. S , wlio 

was Miss Neile Rosier, had regain-' 
ed consciousness, she found that 
her nurse was her old school friend. 
Miss Arvonia Sizemore. 



Tlie suffragettes are gratified to 
see the constant increase in the 
number of women office holders. 
Senator Alice Cartledge of Mon- 
tana is a leading politician of that 
state, and is now a candidate for 
re-election. She is very modest 
about her political success, and at- 
tributes it to the fact that she lias 
a figure for masculine clothes, and. 
as a girl was an expert at fixing 
neckties. 

Another outstanding feminine 
politician is Miss Belle Sawilowsky 
of Georgia, who has recently been 
appointed Attorney General of the 
United States. She has received 
expressions of satisfaction from all 
parts of the United States. 



GIRL FROM OUR 
OLD HOME TOWN 
MARRIES ROYALTY 



Miss Elizaljeth Story, while joy- 
riding in her sport model aeroplane 
was driven to the coast of Africa 
in a storm. Her machine became 
entangled in a tree, and while 
there she met the lord of the Egyp- 
tian tree dwellers. Their marriage 
was solemnized soon after and it is 
reported that she is treading on 
air and is henceforth, "Lady Liz- 
zie."' 



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AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, AUOUSTA, GA., THURSDAY. MAY 21, 1940 



YOUNG MAN WINS HIGHEST KICKER IN DEPARTURE OF 
CARNEGIE MEDAL THE WORLD LEADS POPULAR YOUNG 

DANCING REVUE 
AT DREAMLAND 



Atlanta Youth Honored For 
Bravery 



Atlanta, May 20. — No braver 
deed has ever been witnessed in 
Atlanta than that performed re- 
cently by Tom F one of tlie 

most pcjpular members of the 
>'oun{rt'r set. The youn^ man. see- 
ins; that Miss Addie Sue Weltch, 
Mie occupant of a passin? car, had 
lost c-ontrol of her vehicle jumped 
from the car in which he was rid- 
ing: and into that of Miss Weltch 
while lM)th were goinp: at full speed. 
The car was .soon broufrht to a stctp 
and no one was injured, though 
Miss Weltch fainted. The Car- 
negie medal has been awarded to 
young F 



LECTURER 

COMING SOON 



Auffiista is fortunate in securing 
an engagement for a lecture by 
Miss LiK-y (Joodricli Henry. A 
former missionary to Cliina, she 
was obliged to give up ber work as 
rbief mourner at all Cbine.se funer- 
als on at-connt of a failure of onion 
crops, which were qu'te necessary 
in her line of work. She selects all 
her subjects from poetry, a favor- 
ite one being, "Write me as one 
that loves her fellow man." It is 
said site practices wliat she preach- 
es. 



DR. MOYE 

DISCOVERS NEW USE 
FOR SAWDUST 



AUGUSTAN DEEPLY 
REGRETTED 



Miss May White won many 
wreaths at kicking. She probably 
got her experience from kicking 
alH>ut lessons, kicking up in class. 
and. in fact, kicking everything 
from suitors to the toes out of her 
shoes. Her stage name is Carrye 
la Mule. 



NEW CHEWING GUM 
ESTABLISHMENT 
OPENED 

Big Factory At Thomson 



Tho.mson, ('..v.. May 2o. — Among 
the recent events which will in- 
terest the people of Thomson and 
surrounding towns is the establish- 
ment of the "Pep" chewing gum 
factory. 

The above announcement is in- 
teresting to Augnstans not so much 
from the mere fact that there will 
be more gum in circulation as the 
fact that the wife and business 

partner of Mr. C. S. P . the 

founder of the company was. be* 
fore her marriage. Miss Maydelle 
Scarborough, graduated from Tub- 
man High School in 1925 and has 
resided in Augusta since her mar- 
riage in 1930. 

In 1937 she inherited a large sum 
of money and has used a part of 
it in establishing the factory. 



Miss Martha Lester has lived up 
to the expectations of her friends 
by going to the lunatic a.sybim. 
On account of her great aliility in 
this line she was appointed matron 
at Mille<igeville. She also says that 
much of ber interest in the work is 
due to the hope of meeting many of 
her former schoolmates again. 



W \ 

f LA FLEUR DE LYS <' 

w -^ 

4 Modiste Shop <,■ 

Z MISS INKZ ADAMS, Prop. 1 
f ALL MODELS FKOM PARIS 1 



The position of private secretary 
to the president is also being filled 
by a brilliant Augusta product. 
Miss .^nnie Mae Martin, 



Dr. Catherine Moye, the nation's 
greatest scientist, made known 
her latest discovery today. She 
has discovered a new use for saw- 
dust, from which she has developed 
a breakfast food resembling shred- 
ded wheat. 1 



! COME HEAR 

• (// p<isxihle) 

i Miss Catherine Branch 

I l.F.CTl'RE ON 

r "LOUD SPEAKERS" t 



FIRE AT 

LEARY'S CIRCUS 



A serious fire at Marie Leary's 
circus halted the performance yes- 
terday. The heroine of the occa- 
sion was Miss Marguerite Wescoat. 
who prevented a panic with her 
hiring stunt of hanging to ber 
partner's suspenders by a barrette. 



NEW ARRIVAL 

IN AUGUSTA 

Miss Kleanor Brown, well known 
dancing teacher, will open her 
"Shake-a-I-eg Studio" and will 
specialize in St. Vitus Dance. After 
class hours she will play the tam- 
bouriq^ on the corner of Eiglith 
and Broad for the Salvation Army. 



PERMANENT KINK I 

By Mile. Margie Kingum <^ 
$10 per Victim f 




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AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, AUGUSTA, GA., THURSDAY, MAY 21. 1940 



NEW TEACHERS 

AT TUBMAN 



The faculty of Tubman, always 
exceptional, 1ms several brilliant 
additions this year. It is inter- 
esting to note that several are for- 
mer students of the same school. 

Miss Ida Wall has returned to 
teach Sub Freshman classes. It is 
hoped that her baliy talk will keep 
the Sulis from discarding: their dolls 
and rattles, and growing up. 

Mi.sses Susie Quinn and Ida 
Grossman have taken special cour- 
ses in commercial work and are 
now teachers in this department. 
They are both pleased witli their 
work. 

Miss Gladys Edwards, after 
graduating in 192.i went to Paris 
where she specialized in applied 
art. She is now teacher of art at 
Tubman. 

Miss Flisch's place as history 
teacher is being most creditably 
filled by Miss Rebecca Andrews. 
She has already shown much fore- 
thought and interest by declaring 
yellow cards too gay, and in the 
future these cards will be of laven- 
dar edged with black. 

Miss Sarah Norris is a wonderful 
success as gym teacher. She has 
gained much weight with the girls 
w-ho seen quite fond of their all- 
round teacher. She expects to stay 
at Tubman inde:initely unless 
someone answers the call of her 
heart. 

The vacancy caused by Miss 
Louise Wilson's deciding to accept 
one of the dashing young sheiks, is 
being filled by Miss Orrie Cain. It 
is said that she excels her pre- 
decessor in the art of working 
cross-word puzzles. 

The ex-Tubnian girls are doing 
fine and we are proud of them. 



MISSING GIRL FOUND 

Miss Cliristine Greene, the long- 
soug:ht missing: girl has been found 
in the mountains of Tennessee. 
Due to much worry in trying: to de- 
cide whetlier to get married, be a 
nun or become a movie star, she 
wandered away and is now a her- 



mit. She lias written a poem dedi- 
catee! to all dofrs who howl at the 
moon. We think it is time to 
howl. 



SOCIAL CHAT 



Miss Mabel Downing, designer 
for all of Paris styles, will arrive 
in her private car next week. Miss 
Downing is known in Paris as 
Madame de la Robe. She will not 
stop until she reaches Augusta, her 
old home. 



The contract for entirely re- 
decorating the Bon Air-Vanderbilt 
Hotel has been given Miss Louise 
Holmes. Miss Holmes has studied 
interior decorating for a number 
of years, and will nuike this hotel 
the most exquisite in the country. 



The friends of Miss Alice Sum- 
mers are much interested to hear 
of a romantic episode in which 
she was recently involved. While 
canvassing for "Hoss Hare Tonic" 
in the mountains she was caught in 
a storm from which she was rescu- 
ed by Mr. Ramon Bartholino, the 
famous movie actor. Their mar- 
riage was announced soon after- 
wards. 



The Countess de la Filance, nee, 
Miss Alice Perkins, entertained 
about one hundred and fifty guests 
at her country estate last evening. 
The Countess has just returned 
from Egypt where she traveled 
with her husband and a party of 
friends. 



Miss Elizabeth Panknin has just 
finished her latest painting entitled 
"Spring has Came." It has been 
bought, sight unseen, by a New 
York collector, who reposed so 
much confidence in Miss Panknin's 
ability that he paid for the picture 
before it was begun. It is said that 
she persuaded him to buy it on a 
moonlight night last June. 



"—"—"* 



MODJESKA 

TODAY 

Eulalia Miller 
and 

Philomena Fuller 

in 
"FAIRER DAYS" 






TUBMAN 
HIGH SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 



Established 1874 



..— .+ 



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AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, AUGUSTA, GA., THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1940 



®t}p Augusta (£l)romtb 

(Established 1785) 
The South's Oldest Newspaper 



Published Every Morning 

by 

The Augusta Chronicle 

Publishing Co. 



EDITORS 
DuRoTHV Bell 
IsABELLE North 
Minnie Vaughn 

AUGUSTA TALENT 
We have always maintained that 
Augusta had a remarkable amount 
of talent for a city of her size. 
Here are two new proofs of this 
fact; first a novel, "The Girl in 
White" by Miss Ruth Greene, a 
graduate of Tubman High School. 
The book is a novel full of exciting 
episodes and written in a most 
charming style. This is not a sur- 
prise to Miss Greene's schoolmates, 
who remember the thrilling stories 
she wrote at Tubman. 

The second instance is a book by 
Miss Velma Bell, positively written 
from her own experience on, "How 
to Win the Man You Love". Pro- 
fessor Garrett is adding this to the 
Tubman library in hopes there 
will be no more old maids from 
Tubman. 



ENGAGEMENTS 

WEDDINGS 



GIRL SCOUTS LEAVE 
FOR CONVENTION 



O'NEAL— H 

The many friends of Miss Bernice 

O'Neal and Mr. Richard H 

will be interested to learn of their 
wedding which was solemnized 
Sunday afternoon at the home of 
the bride. 

ROSEMAN— S 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Roseman an- 
nounce the engragrement of their 
daughter, Yetta to Mr. David 

I S , the marriage to occur in 

j June. 



The Augusta Girl Scouts, under 
the chapeKonage of Mrs. Mildred 

Owens B left today for 

Richmond. Va., for a convention. 
This is the first of its kind and 

credit is due to Mrs. B , who 

has devoted the past three years 
to the Girl Scouts. 



AUGUSTA WOMAN 
DOING WELL IN 
OKLAHOMA 

Augustans will be interested to 
hear of the success of four of her 
former citizens who have removed 
to the west. About two years ago 
Misses Emmie Crenshaw, Mary 
Sikes, Claudine Owens and Sara 
Franklin went to Oklahoma to 
build a home on government land. 
Friends from their home town 
report that they own a thriving 
ranch and a beautiful home. 



WANTED— Position, by stenogra- 
pher, can take French dictation, 
play piano, chew gum noiselessly, 
and discuss best seller intelligently. 
—Alma Hitt. 



LETTERS FROM 

LOST LOVERS 

Address letters to Miss Nina 
Spiers, care of the McBean News 
and she will give you advice. 



My dear Miss Spiers: 

I read your letters every week 
and I know you will give me some 
advice. I have been engaged to a 
young man for a number of years 
but he never mentions setting the 
date of the wedding. I have his 
ring, what must I do? 

Ruby Whaley. 

Alls. Set tlie date yourself. 

Dear Miss Spiers: 

I am very much in love with a 
very handsome young man who 
he loves me but he 
Do you think he 



CHIEF OF POLICE 
TELLS EXPERIENCE 



Mi.ss Dorotliy Smitli. Chief of 
Police, told of a narrow escape she 
had ^^■hen she was compelled to 
shoot three men who tried to stop 
the car in which she was driving. 
She says that she was on her way 
to a meeting and was already half 
an hour late, so it was necessary 
to save time by shooting. 



tells other; 
never tells me, 
loves me? 

Helen Evans. 

A)is. Maybe the man is bashful. 

give him the benefit of the doubt. 



Dear Miss Spiers: I 

I have been married and I want 

to get a divorce so I can use my| 

maiden name. I 

I 

What grounds have I to get a; 
divorce on? 

Irma Helm. 

Alls. You are married, that's 
grounds enough. 



PERSONAL MENTION ' 



Mrs. Gladys S has just re- 
turned from a beautiful winter re- 
port at Bel Air. 

Miss Katherine Wiggins is mak- 
ing a great success posing as Mrs. 
Katzenjamner and Maggie Jiggs. 
She has bought out a rolling-pin 
factory to help her in her fruitless 
work of "Bringing up Father". 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 
CONVENTION MEETS 



The National Holy Rollers Sun- 
day School Institute which meets 
here this year will he in session 
through next week. Among the 
teachers are two local women. Miss 
Vaughn Corley, in the primary de- 
partment, and Miss Rose Spauld- 
ing. of the junior department. 



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AUCUSTA CHRONICI E. AUGUSTA, GA., THURSDAY, MAY 2 1. 1940 



FORMER AUGUSTAN 
RETURNS 

Miss Donna Irvine, after beinp; 
civilized in tlie United States, re- 
turned to Brazil and eansed a revo- 
Jution by instituting: the Saturday 
nigrlit bath and prochiiming that 
more than one toothbrusli was 
necessarj- to a family. Miss Irvine 
expeets to be a delegate to the an- 
nual c-onvention of Hot Dog Stands 
which meets this year at Mack's 
and will represent the Brazil nut. 



DR. BAXLEY 
PERFORMS 
MARVELOUS 
OPERATION 



nRdVETowx, May 20. — Dr. Mary 
Lou Baxley, of Cxrovetown, per- 
formed tlie most wonderful opera- 
tion ever known to surgery. She 
took the heart from the body of 
one man and placed it in anotlier. 
This, strange to say, is not tlie first 
heart our world-famous surgeon 
has taken. After the organs were 
set in motion, the patient was able 
to walk from the liospital. 



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GREAT SURGEON 1 
ARRIVES IN TOWN I 



Dr. Margaret Johnson, after 
studying bird's teeth of the mid- 
dle ages in the wiids of Africa, has ; 
arrived in our city and expects to ' 
stay until after the liorse show, [ 
which was postponed on account of j 
delay in her arrival. Dr. Johnson i 
is a great behever in evolution, and ' 
olfers herself as a fair example to ; 
anyone not believing that the liu- ' 
man race came from monkeys. 



IMPERIAL THEATER 

Presents 

Miss Sadie Tunkle 

In 

"WHERE DO GIRLS WHO LEAVE 
HOME GO?" 

In New York For Two Years 




Matinee $2.50, 

Night 3.00, 



$3.00, 
4.00, 



$4.00 
5.00 



Mail 

Orders 

Now 



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Rebecca Andrews 
Catherine Branch 



Vera Carswell 
Jean Davidson 
Clenimie Downing 
Mary Fiske 



Elsie Allen 
Lila Davidson 



Ida Belle Andronosky 
Mary Emma Blanchard 
Ehzabeth Brisendine 
Ruth Clemmons 
Evelyn Copelan 



Marian Brown 
Gaynelle Cumbaa 
Linda Davidson 



Exemptions 

(All Siibjcct.s) 
SENIORS 

Lucy (ioodricli Henry 
Martha Lester 
Gladys Miller 
Belle Sawilowsky 



JUNIORS 

'\'irg:inia Fleming 
Langhorne Howard 
Lois Kelly 
Evelyn McDaniel 
Wilmina Rowland 



SOPHOMORES 

Florrie Edwards 
Marianne Ellis 
Louise Garrett 
Marguerite Hildebrandt 



FRESHMEN 

Elizabeth Ferguson 
Louise Hardaway 
Beatrice Hoffman 
Mary Joplin 
Elinor Kitchens 
Nora Lam kin 
Margaret Minnis 



SUB FRESHMEN 

Lees Goldberg 
Sarah Bright Gracey 
Mabel Hill 
Dorothy Jones 
M''ilhelinina Kelly 
Elizabeth Lockliart 
Anna Montgomery 



Marguerite Wescoat 
Katherine Wiggins 



Estelle Sawilowsky 
Heline Schneider 
Asenath Shivers 
Elizabeth Warner 



Sophie Lee Schneider 
Virginia Stuart 



Laura Robinson 
Edna Rogers 
Ehzabeth Van Pelt 
Thelma Wall 
Margaret Young 



Zella Mae Pearson 
Frances Pierce 
Naomi Pomerance 



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To the Boys of A. R. C. 



These pages would not be complete 

Without a line or two 
Of praise, of honor, and good-will 

From us to all of you. 

We praise you for your sportsmanship 
On diamond, track, and field. 

We praise you for vour courage true, 
To no one may you yield ! 

In future years, where e'er you go. 

Whatever you may be. 
We hope you'll always be true blue 

As YOU were at A. R. C. 



Maiiy FisKE, '26. 



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All Star Basket Ball Team 



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^^J^^-^HE six athletic ]\Iissos j)ictured licre are the stai's in Tub- 
■ ''J iiiairs basket ball crown — and here is how tliey shine: 
^^^^^ Sununei-s, witli a litiie spring, and a powerful sweej), has 
given the ball to Fletcliei-. Quick as a tlasii, this active center has 
slipt the spheroid ])igskin to Schneider. Tiie latter, blocked by an 
efficient opponent, shows her good team work by making a swift side- 
stej) and pass to Burch. A breathless second as this forward gauges 
the distance with keen eye, tiien victorious shouts as the ball neatly 
falls through the basket. Sometimes, however, the fight is waged at 
the other end of the field : then it is that Hilton and Sawilowsky so 
successfully oppose that the scene of action soon shifts again. 



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Let us whisper, when we mention the fact that only one Senior 
is mentioned on this team of stars. But we can boldly say that wliat 
the Seniors lack in quantity, they make up in quality. Eh what, 
Alice .^ 

+ -J- 

LINE-UP 

Alice Summers Senior Jumping Center 

Evelyn Buuch ...Junior Forward 

Mary Fletcher Junior Jumping Center 

Myu.\ Hiltox Junior. ..Guard 

EsTELLE Sawilowsky.. Junior Guard 

Helixe Schxeider ..../;/ nio?- Forward 



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Winners of Numerals in 
Basket Ball 

+ + 

SENIORS 

Alice Summers , Captain 

EuLALiA Miller Running Center 

EsTELLE Sawilowsky Guard 

Alice Summers Jumping Center 

Ida Wall Guard 

Addie Sue Weltch Forward 

K.ATHERixE WiGGixs Forwavd 



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Winners of Numerals in 
Basket Ball 

JUNIORS 

EsTELLE Sawilowskv Captain 

JMary Fletcher. Running Center 

Ida ]\Iae Hagood Jumping Center 

jMyka Hiltox ...Guard 

Estelle Sawilowsky. ....Guard 

Helixe Schxeidek Forward 

Alice Sp.a^xx Jumping Center 



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Winners of Numerals in 
Basket Ball 

+ 4- 
SOPHOMORES 

Julia Bei-l - — Captain 

Mildred Bexson -.-- Running C fitter 

Kathekine Hammond Guard 

Marguerite Hildebraxdt — Guard 

Vera Hixson Guard 

Maude Hurt Forivard 

Ruth Jordan ..Running Center 

Ruth Knight ; Jumping Center 

Helen Littleton _ ....Guard 

Sophie Lee Schneider Forward 



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Winners of Numerals in 
Basket Ball 

■f + 

FRESHMEN 

Lottie Oliver Captain 

Mildred Cartledge - ..Forward 

Elizabeth Brisexdixe Guard 

Mary Emma Blaxchard.. Guard 

Lottie Oliver Forward 

Carolixe Owexs ..Running Center 

Elizabeth Prixtvp. Jumping Center 

Birdie Sawilowsky Forward, 

Carolyx Jarrett Forward 



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Winning Field Ball Team 

JUNIORS 

AIyka Hilton Captain 

Evelyn Burch Side Center 

Vera Carswell Half Back 

Mary Fletcher Side Center 

Myka Hilton.. Center 

Elizabeth Jones Half Back 

Lois Kelly' Half Back 

EsTELLE Sawilowsky- Side Center 

Helixe Schneider End 

Asenath Shivers : .-:...- Full Back 

Alice Spann End 

Theresa Steinberg... ....Full Back 

Winifred Hallmax Running Guard 

Frances Fuller Side Center 



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Gym and Jim 



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The locker room was filled with girls 

Hurriedly putting on clothes 
And chatting, as all girls will do, 

Of teachers, friends, and beaux. 

In one corner sat Betty Brown 

Who said, with a "touching" sigh. 

That she could never get dressed for gym 
So why should she bother to try? 

'I'he whistle blew — tiie girls were gone — 

But Betty, sad to relate. 
Was left behind to wonder why 

She always got there late. 

Now that same night ,Iim 'phoned and said, 

"Oh, Betty, do you su])pose 
You could be ready by half-past-eight? 

Fve tickets for one of the shows." 

Now Betty's reply I will not tell 

But what it was you may guess. 

For she was ready and waiting for Jim 
In five minutes — or even less. 

Now the difference 'tween these little scenes 

Is neither vague nor dim 
For the motive in each will explain the case — 

'Twas the difference 'twixt gym — and Jim. 



M.\RY FiSKE, '26. 



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Statistics 

+ + 

Most Popular Katherine Wiggins 

Most IntcUt'ctiKiJ Cathekixe Move 

Most Ben lit if III Lrcv Goodiuch Henry 

Most Humorous ...Dokothy Belt, 

Most Stylish Sadie Tunki.e 

Most Athletic Alice Summers 



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Hunt Popular :: Katherine Wiggins 




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Most Hifworon.t :: Dohottiy Belt. 




Host Stj/liiih :: Sadie Tunkie 




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iJn»t Athletic :: Alice Simmers 



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vvca.i T.I you've been here 






Fie Id Day 

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Foot Rail and Fair Ladies 



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EI.L, old son, — 
from liis books. 



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wliat's troubling vou, now?"' .s;iid Xcd looking up 



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"Nothing much !" mumbled his room-mate. 
"Oh, speak u]), big-bov," replied the more cheerful of the two. 
"Darn it. you know, Ned, I'm just so tired of all these girls around 



-have they been rushing things too much 



"So-ho ! Mr. Foot ball star- 
lately.''" intcrru])ted Ned. 

"Shut uj) !" warned the otiier. "It isn't that — it's just, it's just — oh, 
tliunder you know. It's the same old line from all of 'em — don't know a thing. 

Oh h !" Lee Crowthers got up from the comfortable old lounging chair 

and strode over to the window. He stood there a moment looking out over the 
campus. Then without turning passed his verdict. 

"See here, Ned ol' man, as you know I haven't let much grass grow 
under my pedal extremities as to the society stunt thus far — but I'll be darned 
if I'm not going to cut it out from now on — entirely !" 

"What's the hurry.'' You haven't got rheumatism as yet and all the 
fair females know you shako a rather wicked leg. old dear. Who's caused the 
reform.''" 

"That woman, Mrs. Eaton, met me up at 'Morleys' this A. M. and told 
me about some niece or something that's coming up for the holidays. She wants 
her to have a good time and — ". 

" — I'm depending on you, Lee, to be nice to her," interrujjted Ned 
mimicking Mrs. Eaton's tone. 

"Yes, that's it — sounds just like her!" Lee answered. 

They both laughed, remembering similiar occasions when Mrs. Eaton's 
nieces, cousins and various relations visited her during the college dances. Her 
guests were aways popular girls but were no different from the town girls. 
They danced marvelously, talked incessantly about nothing, pausing only to 
apply more lip-stick and powder to over painted and powdered faces. Yes — 



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all were made from the same model — from their short bobbed hair to their high 
heeled slippers — all alike ! 

"Pretty Pumjjkiiiheads !" muttered I^ee wrathfully. 

"Oh, cheer u]), me boy, perhaps this Southern Somebody will tlunv out 
your frozen heart," said Ned consolingly. 

"Good Lord — no ! They say they are even worse — greased lightning 
and all that. I'm leaving town — " 

"Be a s})ort and face the music. You've led fair visitors a gay dance 
before this." 

"Nope — leaving town after the game. Well, got a class in ten minutes. 
See 3'ou later." Lee stam})ed out slanmiing the door behind him. 

"Well I'll be — wliat do you know about that.'' The old bov's got it bad 
all right. Sister Eaton always did get him. Lord, she's a pill! Never did 
object to her visitors tho' " — he laughed at the thought. Ned got along 
capitally with everybody and was known as the "college humor". 

"I>eave town," he solihxjuized "not much! I'll see to that." 

The entire student body of I'enn State was alive with excitement during 
the following week. The Thanksgiving game with Pittsburgh University was 
always an occasion of much excitement. The football season had been going 
tine for Penn State and Coach Dempster was very proud of his eleven. Lee 
Crowthers had been on the team for three years and was the star half-back. 

The days passed swiftly for Lee, spent almost entirely in attending 
classes and practice. The team was under strict rules and no one dared to 
break training after the coach's orders. 

One afternoon I^ee sto])])ed in one of the gay little tea rooms which 
adorned the campus. He hadn't been there long before five or six girls trooped 
in, laughing and talking. 

"There's Lee" said one and innneiliately they all rushed over. 

"Hello, Lee, haven't seen you in ages," shrilled a small black haired girl 
whom he'd once considered pretty. 

"Been too busy", he answered indifferently. There was no doubt about 
it — Lee was bored. 

' "Oh, we're just dying to see the game on Thursday", sang out another, 
"I'm sure you'll win." 



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"Thanks — gotta go now" — lie grabbed liis liat and dashcil out. 

"Well, of all things !" exclaimed Betty Marshall, the dark haired flapper. 
"Don't we feel flattered !" 

"He did look darling, tho' " chimed in Jane. 

"Somebody told me Nancy Starr was simply wild about him !" added 
Frances Nowcll. 

"My goodness — siie's not by licrsclf — I'll tell the world!" Jane retorted. 

The M'aitress appeared and their attention was directed to chocolate 
milks and sandwiches, and handsome Lee Crowthers was temporarily forgotten. 

Wednesday before the game, Ned burst into his room and found Lee 
busily engaged in doing nothing. 

"She's a peach, Lee, a perfect peach !" Ned shouted. 

" 'She' — who is it now ? Jane last week and Edith — " 

"Nothing of the sort — ! You know darn well I mean Ann Bevan." 
Ned interrupted. 

"Don't know the lady. Dark or fair.'' RicJi or poor.'' — " 

Ned picked up a battered "History of English Literature" and hurled 
it at his room-mate. It barely missed, — Ned, then, continued his explanation. 

"Miss Ann Bevan of somewhere in South Carolina, who is at present 
visiting our dear friend, Mrs. Nickolas Eaton! Got it.'"' 

"Oh, hell ! her.'"' returned Lee in disgust. 

"You poor prune I — yes, 'her' but you better watch out iiow you talk 
about 'her'. Gee you oughta see her brown eyes — 'Let me call you sweetheart'," 
hummed Ned. 

"For pete sake shut up !" and with that Lee started out. 

"Say, gotta cigarette.-"' called Ned but Lee didn't answer. 

In front of the Science building Lee joined "Chubby" Andrews and a 
few of the fellows. 

"How's our college sheik and star half-back.'"' sang out "Chubb}'" in 
high glee. "Met our little Southern Sweetheart, yet.'"' 

"No," snapped Lee, "and don't want to." 

"Say bo, you don't know what you're missing! Saw her myself yester- 
day and, believe me, she's all right !" volunteered Red Saunders. 



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"Heard all about lier from Ned — don't guess I'll meet her though. I'm 
leaving town after the game — some friends in the country y'know," mumbled 
Lee. 

"Woman hater !" jeered Cliubby. 

"Yea — sick of all of 'em. Make me tired !" Lee stopped short, for, 
just then, from the side of the building came Mrs. Eaton and with her — (Lee 
stared amazedly!) — with her "the girl". 

She was dcliciously small, Lee vaguely thought that she would just 
about reach his shoulder. Her big brown eyes were just then laughing uj) at 
her aunt and the effect was devastating. Mrs. Eaton nodded at the boys, but 
Ann scarcely glanced at them. 

"Oh, Aunt Helen, do look at that lovely gate !" she drawled in her soft 
voice. So utterly Southern thought Lee. 

Soon tliey passed out of sigiit around tiie bend in the walk. 

"Well, how about it, old man.'' Pretty much of all right, isn't she.''" 



said Red. 

"I'h-huh," Lee answered doggedly- 
off' like one in a trance. 



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"Oh gee", he said half aloud, "oh gee, she's all that and then some ! 'a 



peach' — 'pretty much of all right', 'little Southern Sweetheart'- 
and such eyes, such — !" 



-lordee ves ! 



This .soliloquy was cut short by a sudden collision with the head of the 
Math, department, but Lee only mumbled a foolish, '"Scuse me" and hurried 
on leaving the prof, staring after him in astonishment. 

Before reaching the dorm Ia'c decided not to tell Ned about seeing Ann 
and had definitely changed his mind about leaving town after the game. He 
also wondered what was the quickest way to meet Ann Bevan. Ned would kid 
him too much, he decided. Perhaps he had been too emphatic in stating his 
opinions the other day. But encouraged by that old maxim "There are ex- 
ceptions to all rules" he proceeded on to his room whistling. 

Thanksgiving day dawned clear and cold — ideal football weather. The 
campus was resplendent with blue and white, the college colors. The Uni- 
ver.sity team arrived about ten o'clock and all during the day cars and trains 
came bringing enthusiastic rooters for the ])ur})le and gold. The college 
buzzed with excitement. Here and there groups of boys talked excitedly about 
the game. 

Coach Demster spent most of the morning going over the different plays. 
Drawing figures on the blackboard in the locker rooms, he illustrated each 



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])Iiii,se of the defense and ott'eiise. At twelve lie dismissed tlie team witli orders 
to return at two. 

Lee met Phil Gray, the quarter-back, outside and tiiey strolled along, 
toward the dormitory. As they went Phil talked about the game but Lee only 
answered in monosyllables. Lee was mentally discussing the prospects of 
meeting Ann Bevan before the game. Suddenly' he blurted out "Oh I say, Phil, 
liave you met Mrs. Eaton's guest.'"' 

"Yep — but as I was saying, Jim's got to — " 

"Well, look here, I want to meet her. So we're going by Mrs. Eaton's 
now and you're going to do your stuff and introduce me. See.'"' 

"Gosh, Lee — can't ! Coach said to beat it home," Phil complained. 

"Can't help it — won't take a minute — come on !" 

So the two hurried across the campus to the Eaton home. The next 
twenty minutes passed like lightning. Lee was conscious only of a delicious 
satisfaction. Somehow, though, he couldn't talk as easily as usual — the words 
choked up in his throat. 

After repeated attempts at a graceful departure, Phil finally resorted 
to more strenuous measures ; he dragged the protesting Lee away, muttering 
wrathfully as they went, "good crap, ain't you got no sense at all.'' M'Gosh, 
you make me sick !" 

"My Lord, Phil, can't a fellow—" 

"Aw cut it out ! Save your wind for this afternoon." After that 
parting shot Phil hastened to his room. 

When three-thirty came all the seats in the Bowl were filled. Every- 
where could be seen the colors of the two teams flying bravely in the November 
wind. Cheer after cheer filled the air as the enthusiastic spectators voiced their 
excitement and interest in their teams. Suddenly the volume of sound increased 
as the Penn State team dashed single file onto the field led by their captain, Lee 
Crowthers. They were a splendid looking crowd of boys, tall, clean looking 
chaps each intent on winning honor for his own school. Comparing them with 
the Pittsburgh team a strict judge of football material would have seen that the 
boys of the blue and white were lacking a little in weight. But coach Dempster 
was sure of his men and felt confident that what they lacked in weight they made 
up in speed and strategy. 

The cheering ceased and in breathless silence Pittsburgh kicked off far 
down towards the opponents' goal. A rush of flying feet and the game was on! 
Penn State eleven held the visiting team stubbornly ; resisting their advances 
with a splendid defense. The score at the end of the half stood 0-0. 



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The second half was even more exciting than the first and far better 
football was exhibited by both teams. A spectacular 80-yard end run by Lee 
won a touch down for Penn State. Pittsburgh innnediately rallied and scored 
a touchdown and goal 'mid the frantic cheers from the side lines. The score 
now stood 7-6 in favor of Pittsburgh. 

In the last two minutes of the game the Penn State team covered them- 
selves with glory when a splendid forward pass won for them another touch 
down. "Pinkey" Evans kicked a beautiful goal, and immediately the wiiistle 
blew. The game was over with the score l.'5-17 after a hard fought fight. 

Of all exciting things the most supremely exciting is a dance celebrating 
a victorv. The harvest moon was shedding a misty radiance over the earth 
when Lee and Ned arrived at the A. T. O. House. The building was ablaze 
with many liglits, and from the dance enticing sounds of the college jazz band 
were borne far on the air. 

"Oil! go "long mule," lield forth \ed, doing an impromptu dance on tlie 
steps. 

"Lordee, ain't we got fun.'' Gee! Ned, I feel as ha})i)y as a dog with 
two tails, tonight." Lee was ha])py; tiic natural boy-like self-satisfaction at 
jilaying the game well, together with tiie consciousness of seeing Ann, made him 
feel tiiat all was right with the world. 

"Oh. Boy !" he sighed ecstatically as they went in. 

Tlie fraternity house, which was a spacious old home, was thrown open 
for the occasion. The rooms were beautifully decorated with the colors of both 
colleges. 

Ned and Lee were greeted joyously, for I>ee was considered the hero of 
the day. As soon as possible he looked for Ann but found that she hadn't 
come yet. So he found Betty Marshall and "broke" on her. They happened 
to be near the door when "She" came in. Involuntarily Lee stopped and 
stared — Lord! she was a vision. He hadn't fully realized how pretty she was. 

He became conscious that he was making a fool of himself as, from a 
great distance, he heard Betty say: "What's the matter, Lee.'' Seeing 
things.?" 

Betty's voice jarred on his nerves, but he answered vaguely: "Uh-huh, 
guess so !" 

A few moments later he danced with Ann. They hardly talked at all — 
mere words are poor conductors of deep emotion. The orchestra was playing 
something dreamy and low. Ann was happy — perhaps it was the music, per- 
haps it was that she was having a good time — no ! not that, perhaps it was 
— yes, it must be Lee. She hadn't known him a day, but she liked him most 



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awfully. He didn't talk much — quiet boys were interesting though — and tlien 
he was so good looking — his eyes! Was he in love with her? Was she — 

"I wonder," she murmured faintly. 

Just then one of Lee's frat brothers cut in and she was gone. 

Lee joined the stag line, miserably aware of the crowds that separated 
him from Ann. 

"Oh, Tessie, stop teasin' me," pleaded the orchestra in honeyed tones. 

After endless hours the last intermission came which Lee had with Ann. 
They went to a tiny little library where they talked for a long time. 

Every day matters such as the game and the dance were discussed then 
Lee was saying — "Er — I — say — Miss Bevan — " 

"Won't you call me just Ann.'"' she asked prettily. 

"Oh, yes, thanks Ann" — (Confound it! Why was he so dumb.'') "Say 
listen — do you, I mean, are you wearing a pin.'* (Gosh! how dumb that sound- 
ed) "I mean, anybody's fraternity pin.'"' he added quickly. 

"Oh-h-h-yes, er, I mean no," murmmured Ann raising her eyes to Lee's 
then suddenly dropping the long lashes over them. The effect was entrancing 
— and she knew it. 

Lee experienced a queer sinking feeling unlike anything he had felt 
before — so this was love !" 

There was a tingling silence for a moment then Lee began — 

"Well — er — then. Say, look here, would you think about wearing 
mine.'' A.T.O. is a fine frat. Best ever, anybody'll tell you so. Don't say I 
haven't known you long," he hastened to explain, the words fairly tumbling out 
" — been knowing you for ages — honest ! Ever hear of love at first sight — huh.'' 
Sure, I say — won't you wear it.f" Please — " he added whimsically. 

Ann was a tiny bit frightened — just a wee little bit, he was so big — but 
really adorable ! 

"Why — er, yes, of course. That is, if you want me to." 

"Want you to ! Oh my soul — !" And they both laughed a great deal. 
He unpinned the pin and solemnly handed it to her. 

A little later Lee asked Ann to come up for his graduation and the 
dances. It would be such a long time from now but would she — could she write 
him sometimes.'* Ann said she could and would "just love" to see him graduate. 

From the other rooms a dreamy melody floated in — "So give me a June 
night, the moon light and you." 

"Oh, Lee — June" — whispered Ann softly. 

And a wee Cupid, looking on, laughed joyously at young love with its 
rosy dreams. 

Maegaret Johnson, '25. 






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Jealous 



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How well I remember that first day I came to Tubman ! I was a small 
girl, in fact a mere child. Mother had made me a beautiful new dress. 
It was of pongee, embroidered in a grape design, and at last I had the 
opportunity of wearing it. Notwithstanding this wonderful fact, it seemed that 
my heart was about to break. To think that I must leave dear old Houghton 
and most of all Ted, who was always bringing me sweet gum and peppermint ! 
To me tliis tiiouglit was a tragedy. 

As I walked through the large gate by which I was to come so often, I 
stopped and looked around me. There was Tubman in all its beauty. There 
was the velvety green carpet of grass, and the pretty red and rose cannas. 
Anne came running to greet me, saying, "It is splendid, you're just 'gonna luv 
it !' ." Indeed, she must have been a soothsayer, for from that moment it was 
the dearest spot in the world to me. 



Yesterday, that "day o'days," was graduation and yet again I think 
of it. There were our parties. There was the little voile dress, ruffled, em- 
broidered and beribboned. There was the moment when we sang our class song. 
There was the time when Mr. Evans and Mr. Garrett addressed us. Above all 
there was the moment when Mr. Hickman gave me my long worked for "dip." 
Then Ted was there (it was only last night) and we had ridden through that 
Tubman gate once again in his Ford. I had suddenly thought I could hear my 
own heart thumping for it was going at an unusual rate of speed. I had 
wondered, "Am I in love.? Can it be Ted or Vernon.'"' Something whispered to 
me, "No you are in love with Tubman and all that Tubman stands for." I 
wonder how many other girls are in love with my Tubman! I'm jealous. 

Clemmie Downing, '26. 



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Heard in the Locker Room 

S a class gets readv for gym, many and varied are the remarks. Above 
the confusion, the following were heard: 

"Go long, mule, I've got to change everything." 

"Where are Miss Ivey's keys?" 

"Do hurry and o])en the locker." 

"I can't find my stockings anywhere." 

"Here's everything in the world except a black tie." 

"Ouch ! I've got on somebody else's shoes." 

"Allah! Who'll lend me a stocking.'' I lost one of mine coming to 
school this morning." 

"Have vou been to the Modjeska this week.'"' 

"Every time I think of iiaving my picture taken for the Annual, I 
wonder is they going to put it on the funny page." 

"The keys — the keys — Miss Ivey's keys — has any one seen them.'"' 

"Can vou translate today's Latin for me.''" 

"I,end me a safety. I'm about to lose my bloomers." 

The whistle and tiien "Quiet ilown there. You are making too much 
noise." 

I can't wait to be the dashing villain in the Junior Play." 

"Please, somebody lend me a midtly blouse." 

"Praise Peter Rabbit ! I've broken my shoe string. Now, I'll never 
get it laced — it was bad enough before without any tips." 

"Wasn't that a j)erfectly marvelous game yesterday.'"' 

"The Freshman certainly have wonderful material. Can you imagine 
their team by the time they are Juniors or Seniors.^" 

"Has anybody an extra tie.'' Mine vanished in thin air." 

"You'd better wash your hands. Miss Ivey's going to iiave finger nail 
inspection." 

"Go long, nmle, give me the soap." 

Say, any of you all got a file.''" 

"Somebody lend me a hand, and hel}) lace up my slioe." 

(Shrill blast of wliistle is heard). 

"Fall in!" 

and I'm not 



"There goes the whistle 
"Where is my tie?" 
"I hope you make it." 
(Whistle heard again.) 
"Attention for roll call." 



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Elizabeth Warnek, '26. 



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In Chemistry Lab. 

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On a hill that I see from the Chemistry Lab 

There's a little white house nestled down, 
And it's often I wonder who lives in that house, 

Miles away from the edge of the town. 
Perhaps there's a family — seven or eight — 

Or maybe it's just built for two ; 
It may be a dear little spinster lives there, 

Or a maiden whom gallants would woo ; 
Perhaps tliere's a houseful of merry young folks, 

Or a lonely old bachelor crab ; 
But whoever lives there, I envy them, for 

They're so far from the Chemistry Lab. 



Velma Bell, '25. 



With apologies to 

Rock Me to Sleep 



Backward turn backward, O Time in your flight, 

Make me a Sub again just for tonight! 
Miss Green, oh, come back to your algebra door. 

Take nie again to that class as of yore ; 
Take away the geometry you think so rare. 

Believe me, it's filling my life with despair ; 
Over this Junior work late hours I keep. 

Please, have a heart. Let me get some more sleep ! 

Backward, flow backward, O Tide of the years, 

I am so weary of lessons and fears — 
Miss Comey's old English — my themes all in vain — 

Here, take them, and give me my Sub days again ; 
In French class Miss Page simply won't let us play, 

In Latin Miss Dora works our poor brains away ; 
I'm tired writing papers for teachers to keep, 

Please, cut it out. Let me get some more sleep ! 



Jean Davidson, '26. 



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Faculty Statistics 





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MOST ATHLETIC 

Miss Coniey says that any one can overcome 
beinpr pigeon toed by walking five miles of rail- 
road track a day. Also that she thinks its 
easier to knock out a new Suli than knock up 
a chest cold. 



WITTIEST 

Miss Boatwrifrht admits that she's .so funny 
she can't look in the mirror without laughing 
and she heard a girl remark the other day that 
she was ridiculous. 



MOST BEAUTIFUL 

Mi.ss Page asserts that beauty conies from 
soul and that's why so many Tuliman girls lack 
it. She further states that her peaches and 
cream complexion is due to Magic Mud. 



MOST YOUTHFUL 

.Miss Dora, our baby, has just rounded out 
the century mark. A very interesting story of 
her life may be found in any ancient history 
and if her engagenu-nts permit she plans to 
take Father Time's place. 



MOST UNUSUAL 

Miss Braddy has always been up in tlie world 
and can easily look down and ]iity her fellow 
creatures. It has long been wondered why 
such a rarity has escaped Messrs. Barnum & 
Bailev's eves. 



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Faculty Statistics 



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MOST PATIENT 

Mrs. I.yeth is patience personified having suc- 
cessfully nursed the last few generations of Subs 
through two sets of exams, their first date, and 
the exchange from socks to rolled stockings. 



MOST STYLISH 

Miss Odom advises all who want a figure like 
hers to use Wallace Hopper reducing records. 
(Don't everybody speak at once.) She expects 
in time to take a place in Ziegfield Follies but 
at present her waistline is a perfect "36". 



MOST GRACEFUL 

Miss Eve says her firm step is her outstand- 
ing feature and by swallowing one package of 
Wrigley chewing gum a day she is kept in very 
stretchv and elastic form. 



MOST MYSTERIOUS 

Miss Flisch must have been quite a vamp in 
her day for now by merely batting her eye she 
sends enough promise of yellow cards to cause 
any poor girl to make out her will and dream 
of lilies. 



MOST ROMANTIC 

Miss Haddock certainly rattles the bones 
when it comes to playing Heart Dice. She 
also is a great believer in the old proverb, 
"The proper way to a man's heart is thru his 
stomach, " and she acts accordingly. 






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The Passing Affair 



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A\0 was young, in love, and in trouble. The summer before at the 
lake, he had met The Girl. Before the summer was over, they had 
become engaged. It was the most wonderful experience he had ever had. 

But now all was over. In his hand was a letter from Elsie. It was not 
the first she had written him, but the otlicrs — they had been different, oh, very 
much so. They had been his first love letters, and he had them liidden away in 
his bureau. But this one — 

Dear Gano : 

I am afraid I must break off our foolisii little engagement, as I have 
met some one whom I really love, and we are planning to be married in June. 
As it was only a passing affair, I am sure that you will release me from my 
promise. I am returning your ring, and I will be very glad if you will send me 
my picture. 

Sincerely, 

Elsie Smythe. 

" 'Some one you really love !' Oh, Elsie, you said you loved me ! 'A 
passing affair!' How can you say such things.'"' moaned Gano, over and over. 
He would drown himself, tiien she would be sorry. Or he might even hang 
himself — she'd be sorry she ever wrote that old letter. She'd see ! 

She did see, but not the way Gano had meant to show her. He moped 
around the house for a week, trying to decide how to "fix her". Finally he 
went in despair to his sister, and asked her what to do. He told her the whole 
story from the day that he met Elsie to the day that he got that awful letter. 
He even showed her the first ones, the ones that he had held above everything 
else he had. The next day his sister went to all her friends, and got a picture 
of each one, then, with one of her own thrown in, and the one of Elsie, she gave 
them to Gano. She dictated a letter to Elsie, wiiich Gano had to write — 

My dear Miss Smythe : 

It is with deep regret that I am forced to tell you, that, even though I 
remember your name, I cannot remember your face, and so am unable to send 
your picture. But I will send you several pictures of girls that I have in my 
possession, and if yours happens to be among them, you may take it out, and 
return the others to me. As to the engagement, I, also, have met someone whom 
I really love, and so will gladly release you from your promise. 

Very truly yours, 

Gang Richardson. 
She saw ! 

Marianne Ellis, '27. 



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cas a bright May morning," I wrote, and stopped. Goodness, no, 
that would never do. I readied for a well-thumbed little volume 
itled "The Short Story", and turned the pages, seeking in- 
spiration. But here was a suggestion that made me frown. 'Make the first 
sentence attractive; intrigue the reader's interest. Avoid triteness." I drew 
a line through what I had written and cliewed my eraser in despair. 

All this happened about two years ago, the summer I was sixteen, and as 
this was my first story, I didn't have much idea of how to go about it. Really, 
I had only the vaguest notions about it. The only thing fully decided was that 
it was to be very romantic and the hero would be very handsome. At first 
thought I had decided to make him a tall, dignified blond, but later had changed 
him to a vivacious brunette. Otherwise, my story was a mist and an ambition. 

Finally, in desperation I grabbed my hat and started for a walk. 
Somehow I always could think better when walking than at any other time. 
Well, I strolled along, not noticing much where I was going, and when I found 
that I had reached the "business section" of our little one-horse town and was 
passing in front of the studio of our lone photographer. Just for curiosity I 
looked up to see if my picture, taken at the age of ten years, was still there. It 
was, but there was something else that caught my eye and held it. My hero ! 
There lie was, at least, there was his picture. I knew tlie minute I laid eyes on it, 
that here was the hero of my tale. Only his head was in the picture, but I 
could imagine that he was tall and slender. His eyes were dark (brown, I 
thought), and had what the novelists call "a tender light" in them; his lips were 
parted in the most adorable half smile ; and, oh, crowning glory, his hair was 
dark and curly ! 

That was my inspiration. I hurried home and wrote at the rate of a 
mile a minute. I named my hero Clovis Melbourne on the spot, for I love 
unusual names (My own name is so usual — Nancy Wilson — sounds like a cook!) 

From that minute my story progressed beautifully. The plot hardly 
existed, the heroine was nothing but a shadow, but Clovis Melbourne was real. 
The whole thing was awfully mush}' — nothing much but spooning in rose- 
gardens. In fact, it was pure saccharine, but I thought it was wonderful. 

And every day I haunted the photographer's studio getting inspiration 
from Clovis Melbourne's picture. I began to wish that I were the heroine and 
could have him say to me what he said to her. In short — well, I fell in love 
with that imaginary person. I wrote incessantly and even Norma Howard, my 
dearest chum, was neglected. 



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I confess that I was a little tired, though, and glad when Norma called 
uj) and asked mc to come over to a little party, and meet her out-of-town 
cousins, Sidney and Virginia Thoni])son. I'd heard lots about how cute 
\'irginia was, and was crazy to meet her, so I accei)ted gladly. 

Xorma's father is very wealthy — about the richest man in town, in 
fact — and they have a perfectly beautiful home with lovely gardens and 
sunniier houses and even a fountain. Besides all that, the moon was full on 
the night of the party, and the evening was ideal. Then I iiad on my new blue 
dress and felt, well — unusually attractive. To be sure, Tom Wentworth (he 
was the boy I went with) was ])retty boring after dreaming of Clovis Mel- 
bourne; he couldn't talk about anything but the baseball team, but I managed 
to ])ut up with him. 

As I have said, the iiouse is beautiful, and the large rooms made a ])retty 
picture as we entered. There were young peoj^le standing about in groups, 
cliatting gaily, and some were singing around the piano. In this group I 
noticed a tall dark boy, whom I didn't remember having seen before. As he 
turned and faced us, I had a trembling of the heart, for it was — Clovis Mel- 
bourne in the flesh! For a minute I just stared, then grabbed Tom's arm so 
hard he jumped almost out of iiis skin. 

"Tom," I whispered, "who is that boy over there.''" pointing most in- 
elegantly. 

"Wiiy that," said Tom in a most matter-of-fact way, "that's Sid 
Thompson. What in thunder's the matter with you.'"' 

Sid Thomi)son ! Why couldn't he have had a more romantic name.'' I 
felt his parents were sadly lacking in taste. Just then I saw him being piloted 
across the room by Norma, to be introduced to me. I didn't know I could be 
such an idiot. When Norma introduced him, I couldn't say a thing — just 
stared. And the funny part is, I'm usually such a talker. 

He was exactly like my Clovis Melbourne, brown eyes, athletic slimness 
and everything. 

"I'm so glad to meet you," was all he said, but it gave me a thrill up 
my spine. Then, "I had just asked Norma who the charming little lady in 
the sky-blue dress was." 

In spite of my idiocy he seemed to like me pretty well and hung around 
almost the whole time. As I strolled away with Sidney, Tom looked dark and 
stayed jjeeved all evening. 

"See here," he exploded when Sid had left me for a minute, "Have you 
forgotten all about me.'"' 



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"Well, Mr. Wcntwortli," I flared, "voirve been sticking around Ann 
Minturn a good deal yourself." 

Tom looked hurt, "Why I haven't even spoken to Ann this evening." 

I thought that was perfectly })ossible as I had made up the remark on 
the spur of the moment, but I only answered, "Well, you've forgotten about me, 
3'ourself. Do you expect me to walk up and grab you.'"' 

Just then Clevis, (somehow I couldn't think of him as Sid Thompson) 
came up and said in that soft drawl of his, "The fountain is lovely in the moon- 
light. Want to walk out there and see it.'"' And of course I did, leaving Tom 
raging. 

We sat down on a stone bench by the fountain, and just looked and 
listened for a while. Somehow sounds always did impress me more than sights, 
and the sounds in that garden were nmsic. The fountain was murmuring and a 
mocking bird sang far off. 

"Isn't it a glorious night.'"' I remarked. 

"Just the sort that belongs to you," answered Sid. 

Well that was just the beginning. Everything he said was so sweet I 
felt as if I'd been drinking syrup. 

"Do vou know, Xancv," he said presently, "I feel as if I'd always known 
you." 

I was delighted, for that was exactly what Clevis Melbourne had said 
to the heroine of my story. But I only replied. "Well, maybe you've known 
someone very like me. I'm not an unusual sort of person." 

"There never was anyone like yeu, Nancy," he answered fervently. 

That was a most memorable night, but when the party was over and I 
left, (wearing Sid's frat pin, which somehow had an irritating effect on Tom) 
I had the funniest feeling I ever experienced. I managed to be in an ecstacy 
ef bliss, just as I felt I ought, but at the same time, I had a feeling as if I had 
experienced a hard bump. 

After that my ardor for my story cooled. Strangely, toe, for I thought 
that after I had been the heroine for a night I could write about her better. 
But it was just the opposite, I lost interest. 

A few days later my birthday came — my sixteenth birthday. Norma 
must have told Sid, for the night before he called up. I answered the phone. 

"Hello, is this Nancy.'" came Clevis Melbourne's voice. I manufactur- 
ed a thrill. 



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"Yes, is that Sid?" 

"Good guess. We recognized eacli other in a hurrv. But of course 
that's to be expected wlien — say, Nancy, I liear vou'll be sweet sixteen tomor- 
row." 

"I'll be sixteen," I answered demurely. 

"Oh, I know you couldn't be any sweeter than you are. Well, Nancy. 
I just wanted to tell you that it is a very sacred day to me, and if you'll just 
let me come over and bring some token of my — esteem, I'd — " 

The idea ! And I'd only known him a week ! Saccharine isn't so pleas- 
ant in real life, I found. 

So what did I do but slam down tlie receiver ! And the next thing I did 
was to tear up my story into atoms and consign it to the fire. 

I do hope that pli()tograj)lier will take down his picture soon. 

Velma Bell, '2.5. 



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The Poor School Book 

+ + 

QITY tlie poor school book ! For of all the misused and nial-treated 
articles of everyday use, it is the outstanding one. It is always 
receiving insults, complaints, hard falls and consequent kisses to in- 
sure a j)erfect lesson. It never receives any thanks for its service, but is put 
aside with, "Oh, I'm so glad I'm through with you !" It is, in short, the keeper 
of all our hopes, the seat of all our despair, discouragement, and disappoint- 
ment, and tiie root of all our troubles. 

Very fretjuently a good serviceable book is further embellished by draw- 
ings on many of its leaves — two hearts interlocked or maybe, if the owner is 
something of an artist, pictures of girls heads, copied from her favorite maga- 
zine. Perhaps there are notes, sarcastic comments on teachers, written in 
study-hall, and held up to view where, "he who runs may read." 

Then, too, its clothing is generally badly dilapidated by the time it has 
done a year's service. By clothing, I mean its covering. A binding for a 
Latin book, which at tlie beginning of the school season was dull green and 
decorated with gilt fasces, and Roman heads, can hardly be i-ecognized by June, 
and, I daresay, it is worn not so much from study, as from neglect and abuse. 

Another thing that people seem never to understand, esjjecially about 
language books, is that the book already knows wliat all those foreign words 
mean. Why do girls always insist on writing the translation above the line 
and thus doubt the knowledge and hurt the feelings of tliat particular book.'' 
Moreover, if you will notice, you will find that the back of any mathematics 
book is invariably more worn than any other section, you see, tiie answers arc 
printed in the back. 

All school books seem to have the ama/ing faculty of reducing or gain- 
ing weight at the will of the possessor. Sometimes one gains to the extent of 
three or four note books, and it is very rare if there are not letters, ])ost-cards, 
and the like, reposing between its neatly j)rinted pages. At any rate, they all 
seem to be larger at the end, than at tlie beginning of a school year. Is it 
caused by an additional amount of dust and dirt, or is it some poor girl's brains 
whicli she has spent on it .'' 

Surely tiierc is a place where, when all obstacles have been overcome, and 
all hopes fulfilled, the faithful, well-worn books can rest after their storniy and 
eventful career in the school room. 

Catherine Branch, '25. 



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The Rising Generation 

Tlic times aren't what tliey used to be, 

For when a Sub was I, 

The Seniors were so great to me, 

Exalted to the sky. 

Thej' were indeed a noble race, 

And when one spoke to me, 

The awe and pride upon my face 

Were very plain to see. 

But now the times have changed, alas, 

These impudent wee Subs 

Have no regard for our great class. 

They even give us snubs. 

Their deference toward us is small. 

For age they've no respect, 

Their boisterous manners in the hall 

Show terrible neglect. 

Their disregard for rules does not 

Cause praises to be sung — 

Oh no, indeed, the times aren't what 

They were when I was young. 



Velma Bell, '25. 







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Buried Alive 



+ + 

HE awoke witli a start, and witli a queer feeling that sonictliing was 
wrong. Tlicre was not a sound, where usually the trolley cars kc]>t 
kou awake half the night. He jjut out his hand to turn on the light, and 
instead of feeling the lamp, he felt — a wall ! Queer — his bed was not within 
four feet of the wall. Sitting up hurriedly, he bunij)ed his head on something 
hard, like wood. He instinctively put his hand behind him to see if there was 
another wall there, and there was ! Where on earth could he be — for he felt sure 
that he had gone to bed as usual, and that if anything had hajjpened he would 
have waked up, for he was a very light sleej)er. He again put out his hand to 
see if that infernal wall was still there, and, feeling it, he sat up straight to see 
if he would again bump his head. He did, much to his disgust. Then he began 
to think tiiat someone, for some unknown reason, must have buried him alive. 
But why would any sane person do such a thing — he had thought that 
was only done a long time ago, and in barbarian countries. Certainly Louisi- 
ana was not barbarian ! At least it hadn't been when he went to bed. How 
long ago had he gone to bed anyway.'' He remembered looking at his watch, 
but had forgotten what time it said. But if he really were buried alive, who 
could have done it, and why.'' He could remember nothing that he had ever 
done to any one that would cause them to do this tiling. It was just too much 
for him ; he could not make it out. 

Maybe it was a joke, for you never can tell what your friends are going 
to do to you next. But his friends were all away for the summer! It must be 
real ! He gasped aloud at the thought — here he was, buried alive, not even 
knowing who had done it, and with no possible means of escape as far as he 
could see. 

Then the thing he was buried in — coffin, casket, whatever it was — began 
to move, slowly, then faster, faster, and with a curiously familiar sound. Then 
— what a fool he was — not to have thought of it before ! He was in a lower 
berth, going to Atlanta to meet his father. He remembered that he had put 
out his right hand both times, and that his berth was on the right side of the 
car. He breathed a sigh of relief as he put out his left hand, and felt — a 
curtain ! 

Marianne Ellis, '27. 



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Among "Unusual Augusta People" 

the following Tubmanites should be mentioned : 

The girl who understands what Miss Page is talking about. 

The girl who hasn't been rapped on the shoulder by Miss Flisch and told 
not to eat in the building. 

The girl who hasn't heard Miss Haddock say, "I once knew a woman." 

The girl who hasn't fought for a hot-dog down in the lunch room. 

The girl who always gets dressed for gym on time and never has to 
borrow stockings or middy. 

The girl who isn't thrilled to get out of geometry the first period. 

The girl who doesn't adore Friday nights — and hate Monday mornings. 

The girl whose heart doesn't stop beating when a message comes that, 
"Mary Jones is wanted in the office." 

The girl who isn't thrilled by an A. R. C. uniform within the gates of 
Tubman. 

The girl who doesn't know that Miss Flisch is dying to take ukelele 
lessons from Junior B2. 

The girl who has not been "squelched" in the mad rush for a street car. 

The girl who doesn't rejoice when Miss Dora gets off the subject of 
Latin. 

The girl who isn't thrilled to hear the fire signal when she is stalled on a 
geometry proposition. 

The girl who hasn't heard about the $50,000 cow. 

The girl who doesn't know that Miss Woods is an authority on the 
pronunciation of the word "ro-mance !" 

The girl who doesn't work out her diet on a scientific basis. 



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A Sub's Letter to Santa Glaus 



Dear Santa : 

I want you to please bring me 
A doll and a rubber ball, 
Something to keep me quiet 
As I go down the hall. 

My sister. Fresh, wants something 
To make her understand 
Quadratics in her algebra 
So bring it if you can. 

Dear old Sister Senior 
Must take all her exams, 
So bring her a diploma, 
A reward for all her crams. 

A Sub Freshman, 



Sophomore wants a Latin Jack 
To help her keep tab on 
The Gallic Wars of Caesar 
'Til he crossed the Rubicon. 

Sis Junior takes geometry, 
There's nothing wrong with that 
But, as a hint, she cannot see 
Things solid when they're flat. 



'Tat" King, '25. 



Gossip 



+ + 

"Absolute knowledge have I none. 

But my aunt's washwoman's sister's son 

Heard a policeman on his beat 

Tell a laborer in the street 

That he had a letter just last week, 

Written in the finest Greek 

From a Chinese coolie in Timbuctu 

Who said the negroes in Cuba knew 

Of a colored man in a Texas town 

Who got it straight from a circus clown 

That a man in Klondike heard the news 

From a band of South American Jews 

About somebody in Borneo 

Who knew a man who claimed to know 

A swell society female fake 

Who's motiier-in-law will undertake 

To prove her seventh husband's niece 

Stated in a printed ])iece 

That she has a son, who has a f rientl 

Who's sorry sciiool is going to end." 



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Jokes 



* + 



U7io/ /.v it— 
That the one that makes it doesn't want it. 
The one who huys it, doesn't use it. 
And the one that uses it doesn't know it. 

.Inswer — ■ 



Coffin. 



T. H. S. 

Wliat did vou write on for 



Violettp 
English? 

Eunlre — Paper. 

T. H. s. 

Junior to Mi,i.t ll'oorf.s-: This picture of 
George Eliot hioks just like a woman. 



Prof, (rapping on desk): Order gentle- 
men, ORDER ! 

Student (just awakening): Egg sand- 
wich and a cup of coffee. 

T. H. s. 

When do the leaves turn? 
The night l^efore exams. 
T. H. s. 

I call my sweetheart hinges, for she's 
something to adore. 

T. H. S. 

I met her in a revolving door. That's how 
I started going around with her. 

T. H. S. 

A stupid young scholar named I/ancer, 
When asked to recite, stammered "Can't, 
sir," 
But it chanced that the topic, was 
"Please name a tropic," 
So the teacher thought Lancer Said "Can- 
cer". 

T. H. S. 

Said the sad mother of her son who was 
about to start on his career, "Well ! he has 
left us." 

Cad, who pays the bills: "Well ! he hasn t 
left us nmch." 

T. H. s. 

3[i.i.i Odom : What would you expect to 
get if you left K out of KC03? 

Dot Bell: I'd expect to get a zero (0). 
T. H. s. 

Minn Odom : Now, if this experiment fails 
we shall all be blown through the top of 
Tubman. All you girls who are sitting in 
the back of the room come up close so we 
can all go through it together. 



It was May White who made this bright 
remark, "I simply can't remember the names 
of people in books. Why I can't even re- 
member the heroine of Nancy Stair." 
T. H. s. 

"If I give you a penny will you kiss me?" 
asked Johnny's aunt. 

"A penny !" he exclaimed, "Why I get 
more than that for taking castor oil." 

T. H. S. 

Mother: Did you get that loaf of bread 
I sent you for? 

.lohnni): No, the store was closed. 

Mother: It couldn't be this time of day. 
Did you try the door? 

Johnnij: No, 'cause I saw a sign in the 
window, "Home Cooking." 
T. H. s. 

Man: I would like to buy a diamond ring 
for my wife, please. 

Clerk: Glass-wear aisle 1.5 ! 

T. H. S. 

Language is a solemn thing; it grows out 
of life — out of agonies and ecstacies; its 
wants and weariness. Every language is a 
temple in which the soul of man, who speaks 
it, is enshrined. 

T. H. s. 

Pat: Yes, Jack, Tubman is full of Ti- 
tians. 

Jack: Good gracious! Isn't there any 
way of killing them? 

T. H. s. 

From a diary — Jan., Friday 13 — Mr. Simp 
sang, "I May Not Pass This Way Again," 
much to the delight of the audience. 

T. H. s. 

Mias Narhman: Describe the manners 
and customs of the people of India. 

Suh: They ain't got no manners and 
don't wear much customs. 
T. H. s. 

Pnt: Gee, I feel full! 

Jack: How full? 

Pat: Awful! 

T. H. S. 

After a long talk on peace, good-will and 
disarmament, Miss Flisch asked Senior B. 
if they objected to war. 

"I do," said Alice Summers. 

"Why?" asked Miss Flish. 

"Because wars make history and I hate 
history." 



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Jokes 



+ + 



"Is this Savannah river a public place," 
said Jim. 

Eel: Yes. 

Jim: Then it won't be a crime if I land 
a fish? 

Eil: No, it'll be a miracle. 
T. H. s. 

Grare: Louise, if you were rich, what 
would you want most of all? 

Linihi-: ,\n alarm clock witli a "busted" 
bu/./.er ! 

T. H. s. 

Miss Page to Senior B French Class — Did 
l.ouis XIV get ui) and i)ut on his pants and 
coat like we do? 

T. H. s. 

"What could l)e more sad," said the school 
teacher, "than a man without a country?" 

"A country without a man." answered the 
]iretty girl. 

T. H. s. 

IjosI — One fountain pen bv a man, full of 
ink. 

T. H. S. 

Is it kisstomary to cuss the bride? 

.l/i.v.f HaiUUick: "tJirls cut those pota- 
toes in quarters. In other words, in fourths. 
T. H. s. 

Miss Conii'ii: .lean, what is work? 

Jenn: Everything's work. 

Minx ('iinifii: Do you mean to say to me 
tliat this talile is work? 

.leiiii: Sure, woodwork. 
T. H. s. 

Miss Hiiddiirk: What is cold boiled ham? 

Sue: Oh! just ham lioiled in cold water. 

T. M. s. 

A Senior stood on a railroad track, 
'rhe train was coming fast. 
The train got off the railroad track, 
And let the Senior pass. 

T. H. s. 

Ellen (washing lettuce) : Miss Haddock 
lettuce has iron in it, hasn't it? 

Mils Hnihliirk: Yes. 

Ellen: Then are these brown spots on 
tlie lettuce the iron rust? 

T. H. s. 

Miss Ctimei/: Why did you put quota- 
lion marks at the first and last of that exam 
paper? 

Shiilenl: I was (|uoting the girl in front 
of me. 



"He looks like a nmsical sort of fish." 
"Yeh, he's a piano tuna." 



I sent my son to college 
To get what he did lack. 
I spent a thousand dollars, 
.\nd got a quarter-back. 



-:Rulalia, did I hear you say 
: No, mother, I don't use 



Mrs. 

"darn"? 

Ell I II Ha - 
bahv talk. 



RICHMOND HOTEL SIGN 

(1) thiests who are basball players and 
want exerci.se will find a ])itcher on everv 
table. 

(2) (iuests who wake up hungry can 
take a roll in l)ed. 



Such a surprise. 
It was, my dears ! 
Lois bobbed her hair. 
And found two ears! 



"Hey son, where's your father?" 
"Paw is down in the pig pen. You'll know 
him, 'cause he's got a hat on." 



A small girl walked into the store the 
other day and said, "(iinune a nickel's worth 
of asafetida." .Marshall wrapped it u}^ 
and ]>assed it over. "Charge it," said the 
little girl.' "What name?" said Marshall. 
"Hununery Funkel" was the answer. "Take 
it for nothing," said .Marshall, "I wouldn't 
write asafetida and Hununery Funkel lioth 
for no nickel. 

T. H. s. 

Miss fVixnls: Who can give me that old 
proverb about the rolling stone? 

W'ilininn Riiwlanil: A revolving fragment 
of the Palezoic Age collects no Cry]>to- 
ganious \'egetation ! 

T. n. s. 

The reason ideas die quickly in some 
heads, is because they cannot stand solitary 
confinement. 



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m 
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Jokes 



•{• + 



It's the woman who pays. 

Nix; she has everything charged. 



Miss Frank: Mary this is the second 
time this period you have asked to get water 
and it's an every day occurrence. 

Mar If. But I can't help it, English is so 
dry. 

T. H. .S. 

Miss Chiles: Every girl must have a Mid 
Summer Night's Dream by Monday. 



Sub: It's the little things in Tubman that 
count. 

T. H. S. 

Fresh : Where are the Sophomores prac- 
tising their yells? 

Fresher: Judging from the sounds, I 
should say over the whole building. 




Betty: Don't you think Susie's voice 
ought to be cultivated? 

Bert: Yes, plowed completely under. 



There had been an epidemic of chicken 
pox but so far little Freddy had not had it. 
One morning he came down the stairs crying 
in surprise: "I got the chicken pox because 



there 
ing. 



was a feather in mv bed this morn- 



So vou have broken off a tooth 



Doctor 
have you?" 

Jack : Yes, sir. 

Doctor: How did you do that? 

Jack: Oh, shifting gears on a I>ollipop. 



Whatever troubles Adam had, 

No man in days of yore. 
Could say when Adam told a .joke, 

"I've heard that one before !" 

Signed— The Staff 




m 
1 

i 



m 



m 
i 

1 
i 

m 



1 



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1 



1 

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^l§]l^i^3l§llgli§Ml§1[§]lgDig[§1[^l5Ml§]l^i§Mil]lM11^Ml§1lS|[gpK 






■'^^^ 




^>^: 



(j^.Dill, Kow do c^ou spell LolJar- 

Witk ONe arrow oir two a^i^ows?' 



Get 4i f^T^d^wi^^^t 



FOR GIRLS 




Established in 1874. First building, twice enlarged, on 700 block 
of Reynolds Street, destroyed by fire March 22, 1916. 

New building on 1700 block Walton Way erected 1917. First 
used January 26, 1918. 

Building has twenty-six Class Rooms, Principal's office, five 
Science Laboratories, Music Room, Art Room, Gymnasium 
Library, two Study Halls, Locker Rooms, Rest Rooms, Faculty 
Room, Lunch Room, Assembly with eight hundred and sixty-four 
seats. Equipped throughout with modern school furniture. Ten 
acres School site. Large grounds for all athletic sports for girls. 

Offers Courses in the Following Subjects 



LANGUAGES: 

English 
Latin 
French 
Spanish 

MATHEMATICS: 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry 

Trigonometry 

HISTORY: 

Civics 

Ancient 

Modern 

American 

Economics 

SCIENCE: 

General Science 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Physics 



COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS: 

Commercial Geography 

Bookkeeping 

Stenography 

Typewriting 

Penmanship 

Business Forms and Customs 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE: 

Cooking 

Sewing 

Household Management 

Applied Art 

Drawing, Design, Etc. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING: 

VOCAL MUSIC: 
(In Class) 



T. H. GARRETT, Principal 



— 4 




Composer of CMP HANCOCK MARCH" "REGIMENT BAND MARCH" 

"CHATEAU L^VERT MARCH" 

"ROMANZA'Etc. 



Pu bibbed by 
J. LOUIS SAYRE, 

410 Eleventh St., 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA. 



.(25J). 



WOMEN FIND BANKING A PERFECT 
PLEASURE WHEN THEY AVAIL THEM- 
SELVES OF THE CONVENIENCES AND 
COURTEOUS SERVICE FURNISHED BY 
THE GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK. 

WHETHER YOUR ACCOUNT IS LARGE 
OR SMALL, YOU WILL FIND THAT 
THIS INSTITUTION GIVES YOU HELP- 
FUL AND SATISFACTORY ATTEN- 
TION. 

THIS BANK APPRECIATES THE PAT- 
RONAGE OF WOMEN AND SPECIAL- 
IZES IN SERVING THEM 



GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK 

701 BROAD STREET 



UPTOWN BRANCH 
1113 BROAD 



AUGUSTA 



GEORGIA 



-+ 



+ 



+ 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE GRADUATES 

H. H. CLAUSSEN'S SONS 

BAKERS OF QUALITY BREAD AND CAKE 



+ 



'Twas amateur night at the Opera House, 
R. Crusoe was the play; 
A, Hurricane swept across the stage. 
And blew the cast-awav. 



Every Purchase From 

PIGGLY WIGGLY 

Stores must give you complete sat- 
isfaction, or your money will be 
cheerfully returned, without ques- 
tion. 

STORES AT 

1132 BROAD 

730 BROAD AND 

504 BROAD ST. 



+■■ 



Southern States Phosphate 
& Fertilizer Co. 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 

ALL GRADES OF MIXED 
FERTILIZER 

ACID, KAINIT and NITRATE 
SODA 



. — + 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

SMITH BROTHERS 



4. 



I 



The 

National Exchange 

Bank 

"AUGUSTA'S ONLY NATIONAL BANK" 

A NATIONAL BANK 

With 

A SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

In Which 

EVERY TUBMAN GIRL IS CORDIALLY INVITED 

TO HAVE A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

START WHILE YOUNG 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



He: "For once I'm glad to be down and out." 

Him: "How zat'" 

He: "I've just been for a ride in an areoplane." 



HOME-BUILDERS ATTENTION 

THE MORE BURNED CLAY USED, THE BETTER 

THE HOUSE 

WE MANUFACTURE: 

Common Building Brick 
Augusta Smooth Face Brick 
Rough Texture Face Brick 
Hollow Fireproofing Tile 
Denison "H" Walltile 

GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

H. R. WALKER H. H. STAFFORD, 

Sales Manager President 



•■+ 



STELLING SHOE CO 

810 BROAD STREET 

Retailers of 
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

'YOUR INSPECTION INVITED" 



"Have you noticed the latest in men's hair cuts?" 
"Yes, women." 



PALMERSPIVEY 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

BUILDERS OF THE TUBMAN, HOUGHTON AND 
MONTE SANO SCHOOLS 

AUGUSTA, GA. CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

*|«i.— ^KR^— m^— ■■•^■ii— ii^— hh— m— mi-^iiii^— RR^— in^— m^— ■■-^■ii^—K*^— ii>^— an^— Kii^— Hii^— iR^— Ri^— i*^— 11^— 11^— «M^— RM^— la— 



+ 



Vou 'II Like Our Work 



We have enjoyed a period of successful operating 
for over twenty-five years. We are offering you 
QUALITY WORK and PROMPT SERVICE. 
Those dainty shirt waists and flimsy negligee will 
be properly handled and carefully laundered. In 
fact if it's anything to be laundered remember — 



HULSE LAUNDRY 

"JUST A GOOD ONE" 

A. H. HARDY, Prop. 
513 - PHONES - 6871 



i 



For Rent: Two rooms suitable for two school teachers or two ladies. Phone 2809J. 



Murphy 

Stationery 

Company 

High Grade Correspondence 
Paper and Cards 

ENGRAVING 

GRADUATION AND GIFT 

BOOKS 

Waterman Fountain Pens 

KODAKS and FILMS 



..+ + — 






* 



" "" °" "" "" "" ""■^"•t* ,}.„^«i._-i,n.^i.r.^lli..^l 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

AUGUSTA 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 



1 



CONGRATULATING 

ANOTHER CLASS OF TUBMAN GRADUATES 

—The Class of 1925! 

Remember, girls, you are among our most valued customers. We 
want to be a real service to you, now, and on thru the FUTURE — 
that wonderful time that is just opening up for you. It is our ambi- 
tion to supply you with the things you want, at prices that represent 
fullest value to you. That is our justification for being in this busi- 
ness of selling. 

If we can help NOW with the graduation 
wardrobe and accessories — LATER with 
college equipment. Please let us do so. 




Went: "Got my golf socks on today." 
Worth: "How's that?" 
Went: "Eighteen holes." 



..+ +.. 



Compliments of 

HOTEL 
RICHMOND 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

200 Rooms— 200 Baths 
MODERN AND FIREPROOF 



CULLEY & HAIR 

SPORTING GOODS 

and 

HARDWARE 

Augusta, Georgia 
I 

I ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

I FOR ALL SPORTS 

I 

I 

I 

I I 

+ + — ,._,. . . — . — . — . 4. 




THAT SATISFY 

At Prices That Please I 

We Are Prepared — 

For the "Sweet Girl Graduate" who wants the correct styles for 

Spring and Summer. 

You must see our wonderful variety of styles to appreciate our 

efforts to please you. 

Special Discount Given on footwear for Commencement. 

Saxon-CvWuniShocCo. 



^^^^™» ALWAiS BUSY 



■BiSIZ^PEB^H 



He: "Why the black dress^ — somebody die?" 
She: "Well, the old year passed away didn't it?" 



,. „_.._„_.* +.. 



LIKE SUNSHINE 

IN WINTER 

A reminder of summer, a promise of 

spring, but a present delight above 

everything 

DRINK BOTTLED 




cca'i 




Delicious and Refreshing 

AUGUSTA COCA-COLA 
BOTTLING CO. 

Broad and Seventh Sts. 



GOETCHIUS' 

Broad and Seventh Sts. 

DRUGS 
SODA WATER 
KODAKS 
CANDY 

GOETCHIUS' 

One Store Only 



.'--5. *.— .. 



,B „„ „4, 



. — + 



Enterprise Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

FINE COTTON GOODS 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Spindles— 35,250 



Looms— 980 



"I tell you, my love for you is making me mad — mad — mad!" 

"Well, keep quiet about it. It's having the same effect on my father.' 



..+ +._ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

SMITH HARDWARE 
COMPANY 



LOMBARD 

IRON WORKS 

& SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

MACHINERY, SUPPLIES 

REPAIRS. CASTING 

ROOFING, PUMPS 

EVERYTHING FOR THE 
MILL 



..+ +.. 



+ 



— + 



The Citizens and Southern 

BANK 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

Interest Paid on Savings Quarterly. Start Life Right by Opening 

a Savings Account 

TOTAL ASSETS OVER $70,000,000.00 

NO ACCOUNT TOO LARGE— NONE TOO SMALL 

ACTS AS EXECUTORS, GUARDIANS, TRUSTEES 



"Rastus, who fo' you tote dat 'er razor to dis dance?" 

"Niggah. don't yo rad, yourself, as how dis heah am to be a cut-in dance." 



^.. .._. — .._.. . . . — .+ *, 



Buy 
The Tubman 

Girls 

GRADUATION 
GIFTS 

AT 

Schweigert's 

The Leading Jeweler ? ; 

1 ! 

T I 
II, ,, „ „ ,«-^u4. a*.i- 



Personal Beauty 

Is a Better Introduction Than Any 
Letter. — Diogenes. 



ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Preparations Combine All That 

Could Be Desired to Make 

Your Dressing Table 

Complete 

You Will Find Also at Our Store 

A Complete Line of 

Babani Perfume 



GARDELLE'S 

726 BROAD STREET 



DELICIOUS SOUTHERN BISCUITS 

MADE FROM 

EARLY BREAKFAST 
SELF-RISING FLOUR 

CLARK MILLING CO 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Alice: "Teacher, what is steam?" 

Teacher: "It's water gone crazy with the heat. ' 



George C. Blanchard Francis A. Calhoun 

Blanchard & 
Calhoun 

REAL ESTATE 

Investment Securities 
Insurance 

Homes for Sale Convenient to 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

MARION BUILDING 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



4. , i 

QUALITY GARDEN 


HOSE 




HUTT' 


s 


PLUMBING 




SUPPLIES 




611 BROAD STREET 
+ . 


+ 



4. 



■ — ■+ 



Augusta-Aiken Railway & 
Electric Corporation 

POWER LIGHT HEAT 

STREET CAR SERVICE 

Good Wishes for the Tubman Girls 
Expressed in Efficient Service 



He: "What would you do if I were to kiss you on the forehead? 
She: "I'd call vou down." 



..+ 4... 




LADIES' OUTFITTERS 

Our Authentic Styles and Mod- 
erate Prices Have Earned 
for this Store the Repu- 
tation of 

"THE STORE OF BETTER 
VALUES" 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

SOUTHERN 

FINANCE 

CORPORATION 



■.4. +. 



+ . . . — .._. . — . — . 



STRENGTH-SAFETY-SERVICE 



UNION SAVINGS BANK 



*% 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



INTEREST PAID QUARTERLY 



Miss Norwood: "What kind of an animal is a cat?" 

Brilliant Soph: A cat is an animal that sticks its tail under your rocking chair. 



+„_.._.._.._.._.._.. . 

Compliments of 

LOUIS K. LIGGETT CO. 

Edwin L. Murphy 

Manager 



+■■ 
I 



+ 



1 



., + 



VISIT 

THE COZY STORE 

Where you will find new and well selected 
stocks of 

MILLINERY 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 

NOVELTIES 

E. C. BALK & CO. 



918 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 382 



GIRLS' SHOP 

We specialize in Hosiery, 
Athletic Sweaters, Coats, Reg- 
ulation Middies and Dresses 
for Girls. 

Madge Evans Hats 
for Girls 



Henry: "By mistake they sent me back some lady's laundry.' 
Dick: "Yeah? What was it?" 
Henry: "Oh, nothing to speak of." 



GEORGIA VITRIFIED BRICK 
AND CLAY COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

PLANT AT OFFICE 

CAMPANIA, GA. LAMAR BUILDING 

,{l„ nii_»« ■■ ■■•^M'^ii.— ■■— ■> IB aa ku bm an an nn m un an iin nii_— an iiu un an un un — ni. im i.*!* 

^„__Ba ■■-_,.,_-■■— ..n_.n—MD».„_Bo.^g.^.u an m Ma un tm UB no nn nii uu ii« im no— n« nii ua nu !>•{• 

The Realty Savings & Trust Co. 

Solicits and appreciates the Savings accounts of young ladies 

WE I 55^% on time certificates 
PAY ( 5% on savings accounts 

JOHN PHINIZY P.H.RICE RUSSELL K. WHALEY 

A. B. VONKAMP C. K. LAWRENCE. JR. JAMES B. MULHERIN 

JAMES R. LEAGUE J. FRANK CARSWELL WM. P. WHITE 

GEO. SANCKEN J. LEE ETHEREDGE C. H. PHINIZY, SR. 

T.D.CASWELL LeROY W. LYETH JOEG. BELDING 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 



MODJESKA IMPERIAL 

RIALTO 
THEATRES 



Sub (On Tubman Special): "Conductor, which end of this car do I get off at?" 
Conductor: "Either end — both ends stop." 



L. J. SCHAUL ^ CO. 

DIAMONDS AXD jKWF.LRV 
»w BROAD STREET PHONE .-.4^ 



I 
+ - 



I 



.._.+ 



Compliments of 



The Augusta Herald 

THE HOME NEWSPAPER 

The ONLY Paper in Many Homes — The One Paper 
in MOST Homes 



I 



RICH MILK AND CREAM 

FROM 

HEALTHY, WELL FED, CONTENTED 

JERSEY COWS 

TUBERCULIN TESTED 

THE SANITARY DAIRY 

Phone County 2111 



Student: "Are those chords from Chopin? 
Miss Halbert: "No, they're Handel bars." 



I 

-+ 




CAMP ARROW-HEAD 

(TIDWELL'S CAMP) 

"jl THERE you can spend 
'^ a most enjoyable va- 
cation with your own 
friends. Make up a con- 
genial party now. 

For reservations and further information, 
Phone or Write 

JULIAN OLSEN 

In care of Y. M. C. A., Augusta, 



J. LOUIS SAYRE 

(Composer of 

"Tubman High School March") 

Instruction in 

MUSIC 

PIANO VIOLIN 

SAXOPHONE MANDOLIN 

Efficient Dependable 

Studio: 410 Eleventh Street 



WHEN you rent Camp 
Arrow - Head your 
party has exclusive use of 
entire camp for day, week- 
end or week. 

RATES REASONABLE 



THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER CO. 

R. H. JOHNSTON. SALES AGENT 

825 Telfair Street Augusta, Georgia 

PHONE 2777 



•t*" "" "" "" "" "" °" "" "" "" "" "" "" '" "" "" "' "" "" "" "" "" "" 



.. — + 
— + 



Established 1858 

The Perkins Manufacturing Company 

YELLOW PINE LUMBER 

MILL WORK, DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS 

620 13th St. AUGUSTA, GA. Phone 3 



■ — + 



+ . — . . 



I 



SPORTING GOODS 

JANTZEN SWIMMING SUITS 

TENNIS SUPPLIES 

Bowen Bros. Hardware Co. 

829 BROAD STREET 



+ — 

+ — . 



, — + 
. — + 



HEATH, BOLSTER & TURNER 

Wholesale 
FRUITS, PRODUCE, GROCERIES 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

Phones 1271-1272 



+ 



4.. — . .,_.._„_.._.._., + 

- 

WITH BEST WISHES FOR 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

JOHN F. CARSWELL 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 
842-6 Liberty St. Phones 9380 and 9171 

T 



HERFF-JONES CO. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS AND STATIONERS 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 

OFFICIAL JEWELERS 

for 

TUBMAN HIGH STANDARD CLASS RINGS AND PINS 

Permanent Guarantee. Ring or pin can be secured any time for any year. 

H. S. CANFIELD, GEORGIA REPRESENTATIVE 

^. — , . . — . ._..—. — . — . . . ._.. — ._„_.. — .J. 

4.._,._.._.._.._..— ..—..— .. — ._.,_.._. — .._.. — ._,._,._„_,._.._.._„_.._.._.._„_.._„ — .J. 

STULB'S RESTAURANT 

Opposite Monument 

735 BROAD STREET 

W. J. Heffernan Proprietors Carl P. Byne 

Open 7 A. M. to 12 P. M. 



+■■ 



+■■ 



— -B R I C K 

Manufactured by 
MERRY BROTHERS 

ARE HIGH GRADE AT RIGHT PRICES 
25 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS 

Large Capacities — Operating Year Round 
Correspondence Invited 

Marion Bldg. Phones 571-572 



+■ — 



I 



+- 
+■- 



THE 
INTERNATIONAL VEGETABLE OIL 

COMPANY 

"COW FEEDS" 



-+ 



+■■ 



MURPHEY & CO. 

Established 1844 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

AUGUSTA'S OLDEST BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT 



■■+ 



Compliments of 

SOUTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

ALEXANDER cV CxARRETT 

REAL ESTATE DEPT. 



+ — .. — . . . .. 



+ — 
I 




CADILLAC & STUDEBAKER 

Sales, Service and Parts 

PHINIZY & CONNELL MOTOR CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 







+ — 



"BREAD IS THE 

STAFF OF LIFE" 

IDAHOME FLOUR (Plain) 

TWINIDA FLOUR (Self-Rising) 

Makes Perfect Biscuit, Rolls, 

Bread and Pastry 

CARR-LEE GROCERY CO. 

Wholesale Distributors 



HATS FOR THE WHOLE 

FAMILY 

Men's, Women's and Children's 

Every Shape and Style Made 

SHERON'S 

578-80 Broad Street 



.+ ^.—..—. . 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

GEORGIA IRON 
WORKS 



AUGUSTA DRUG CO, 

Wholesale Druggists 

305 to 311 JACKSON ST. 
Augusta, Ga. 






T 



Pansy (romanticail.v) : "Oh, mother, said the fair daughter. I want to rise to higher 
things. I want to be above the common mortals and to occupy myself with things in 
the freespaces of the upper air." 

Mother: "That suits exactly. Pansy, you can climb right on this step-ladder and put 
up the clean curtains. 



1 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE 
AUGUSTA CHRONICLE 

"The South's Oldest Newspaper" 



RHODES-HARKINS 
FURNITURE CO. 

COMPLETE 
HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

1007 Broad St. 

Augusta, Ga. Phone 672 



. , .. — , — ^ 






ORIOLE RANGES 

BETTER 



BAKE 

BROIL 

BOIL 



ASK YOUR GAS COMPANY 

ABOUT 

OVEN HEAT CONTROL 

THE GAS LIGHT CO. 



<.. — 



I 



WHALEY BROS. 

Builders Supplies 

641 BROAD ST. 
AUGUSTA GEORGIA 



PICTURES AND FRAMING 
PICTURE FRAMING 

THE BEST 
AT LOWEST PRICES 

HARPER BROS. ART 
STORE 



426 EIGHTH ST. 



PHONE 730 



+ 


. . 4. 

Maxwell Brothers 




FURNITURE 


937 


Broad St. Phone 836 




Augusta, Georgia 



— + 



• — + 



. — + 



REMINGTON PORTABLE 
TYPEWRITERS 

Have Standard Keyboards Just 

Like the Big Machines 

IDEAL FOR HOME USE AND 

TRAVELING 

L. J. HENRY 

THE TYPEWRITER MAN 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



„ „ ., .„ ,,J, , ,1 ml 



.. + 



It was a dark night. A man was riding a Ijicycle with no lamp. He came to a cross 
load, and did not know which way to turn. Through the gloom he saw a sign post. He 
felt in his pocket for a match. He found but one. Climbing to the top of the pole, he 
lit the match carefully, and in the ensuing glimmer read: "Wet paint." 



t- 



SHAPIRO'S 

1036 Broad St. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



AUGUSTA SHOE 
REPAIRING 

J. Sawilowsky's Shoe Renury 

975 Broad St. Phones 943-3714 

Augusta, Ga. 






„ „, fl, „, „ „„ ,,4, 4,,, ., ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, 



POSTER ADVERTISING 



BULLETINS 



MILLIGAN ADV. 
SERVICE 

SIGN PAINTERS 



KB— iin.— nn na -i n*|« 

+ 

CARPENTER'S 

50 50 

GROCERTERIA 

STRICTLY AN AUGUSTA 
CONCERN 



710 BROAD ST. 



■ + + 



POPE & FLEMING 

COTTON FACTORS 

AUGUSTA 

Established 1881 



I 



T" "' " " " " 



. , .. ^ ^. 



*^n-— on nn no 



•LET US DO YOUR REPAIR I 

WORK I 

We Will Gladly Send For Car j 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED ! 

We Have Up-to-date Repair ! 

Equipment j 

None But Genuine Ford Parts Used | 

LOMBARD MOTOR CO. 1 



I 719 Broad Street Phones 2249 and 3191 

I Opposite Monument 

+ — ._, . , — . — ._.._.._.._.._ 



I 



T.D.CAREY WARREN BOTHWELL 

T. D. CAREY & CO. 

INVESTMENTS 
SECURITIES 



M ■■«— DH n*{« 



ELECTRICAL REPAIRS 

Motors, Lighting, Wiring, Radio 

Motors Bought, Sold and Rented 

Houses Wired, Radio Sets Sold 

and Installed 

Repairs to anything electrical 

EVE REPAIR CO. 



852 CHAFEE AVE. 



PHONE 1727 



When father pays his income tax 
Hoping a dollar to save, 

He finds the crimp in his pocket-hook 
Is really a permanent wave. 



..* +.. 



+"■ 

A.. 



AWNINGS PORCH SHADES 
WALL PAPER 

T. G. BAILIE & CO. 

712 BROAD ST. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



ARRINGTON BROTHERS 
&C0. 



BIG BOY 

'BEST IN FRUIT DRINKS" 

CHERO-COLA 

"THERE'S NONE SO GOOD" 












J. A. MULLARKY CO. 

8S0 BROAD ST. PHONE 290 

The most reliable store 

to buy your Dry Goods 

and Ready-to-Wear. 



COME IN 



THANK YOU 



LAND DRUG COMPANY 

Cor. Broad & Marbury Sts. 

Augusta, Ga. 



! ! 



R. H. LAND 



F. J. BODEKER 



! ! 

i I 



Say It With Flowers 

from 

BALK'S NURSERY 

226 Greene St. 



+, — 



i i 

I i 



I 



I 

+ ■ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

ALBERT H. FilARSH 



MASONIC BUILDING 
Eighth Street Entrance 

Augusta, Ga. 






E. O. COOPER 

Real Estate — Renting 
Fire Insurance 



1 

•4 



"Wlun a l)ad cold nu-ets a Kood disposition the l)ad cold wins." 



"*r 4*" M»^11».^N1I «U 11.1 U<, 



R. E. ELLIOTT & SONS I 



R. E. ELLIOTT 



R. A. ELLIOTT 



FUNERAL HOME 

L. F. ELLIOTT S. H. ELLIOTT 

Office Phone 505— Res. Phone 1546 

Corner Telfair and Twelfth Sts. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



1 I 

I I 

I I 

I I 



I 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

AUGUSTA GROCERY 
COMPANY 



+ — 



+ 



C. T. FUND & CO. 

Grocers' Specialties 

Agents for 

GELFAND'S Combination Relish 

and Mayonnaise 



+ . + 

COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


N. HILDEBRANDT 

i H 



.._.+ 



I 

ELLIS ICE & COAL CO. j 

DEPENDABLE I 

i 

1400 BLOCK ELLIS STREET i 

AUGUSTA GEORGIA j 

1 

I 
•t*"^"" ii^— ii^— 11^— ■■^— «» ii^—an^— «B^— 01^— m- ^ 

+ .. ..— .* 

COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

ATLANTIC 
ICE AND COAL 
CORPORATION 



W. J. MULHERIN CHAS. F. MARKS 

MULHERIN & MARKS 
SHOE CO. 

844 BROAD ST. 
] Leaders in 

i LADIES'. GENTS' AND CHILDREN'S 



1 
! 



FINE FOOTWEAR 



GENERAL TIRE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 

GOOD SERVICE 

1167 BROAD STREET 



"What became of the gate you and your girl used to swing on?" 
"She gave it to me." 



FRANK J. STORY CO. 

PAINT AND GLASS 
HEADQUARTERS 

855 BROAD ST. 



... + 



PERKINS SASH & 
DOOR CO. 

HIGH GRADE MILL WORK 

LUMBER AND 

BUILDING MATERIAL 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

.._,. ,. .. ,. ,„ ,„ .. „. „ „. BB — .lA 



E. J. Hernlen 



Fred He 



WIRTZ & HERNLEN 
COMPANY 

Dealers in 

Hardware and Farm Machinery 
The John Deere Line 

601 BROAD ST. PHONE 3604 



...J. 
■■+ 



Sales 



Service 



Parts 



McGOWAN-MOTES 
MOTOR CO. 



521-623 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 367 



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PRINTERS, BINDERS 
AND ENGRAVERS 




C®We invite the trade of 
those who appreciate the 
prompt and intelligent 
handling of their business. 
C® We are the printers of 
this volume of Maids 
and A Man. 



820 REYNOLDS ST. :: AUGUSTA, GA. 
PHONE 667 



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